Wired

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Technology should focus on the complementarity game, not the imitation game.

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brainpickings

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“To see ourselves as others see us is a most salutary gift. Hardly less important is the capacity to see others as they see themselves.”

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phototraces

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Known as the Supreme Master of Landscape Photography, Ansel Adams is by far the most important name among famous landscape photographers.

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Design Boom

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'petit market' by nendo is an adjustable roadside vegetable stand that promotes the spread of cheap and fresh agricultural products.

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Dezeen

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Part of Dezeen x The Mindcraft Project, Chair 02 shows young Danish studio Archival Studies taking an architectural approach to furniture design.

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Design Week

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Less But Better has been curated and designed by London-based Systems Studio and aims to introduce the German designer’s work to “new audiences”.

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This is Colossal

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Using the Brico System for letterpress printing requires thinking of every possible combination from A to Z. The simple method involves just four shapes to create typographic forms and geometric renderings, and it founded a recent collaboration between artist and printmaker Anthony Burrill, designer and printer Thomas Mayo, and Oli Bently, who helms the Leeds-based studio Split and the People Powered Press, a non-profit printer that’s the largest letterpress operation of its kind in the world.

Together, the trio created one monochromatic print of every letter, which span 1.5 meters. “With near endless possibilities of letter forms, weights, sizes, and styles, it was created so that anyone can share in the joy of type design,” they say.

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The Next Web

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People are increasingly aware of the harm plastic waste causes to wildlife, and many would avoid buying single-use plastics if they could help it. But are the alternatives to plastic much better?

Let’s look at one example – fizzy drinks. You might assume that plastic bottles are the least green option, but is that always the case?

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Google

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In 2010, when scientists were preparing to smash the first particles together within the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), sections of the media fantasized that the EU-wide experiment might create a black hole that could swallow and destroy our planet. How on Earth, columnists fumed, could scientists justify such a dangerous indulgence in the pursuit of abstract, theoretical knowledge?

But particle accelerators are much more than enormous toys for scientists to play with. They have practical uses too, though their sheer size has, so far, prevented their widespread use. Now, as part of large-scale European collaboration, my team has published a report that explains in detail how a far smaller particle accelerator could be built – closer to the size of a large room, rather than a large city.

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The Guardian

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On 26 October 1969, the Observer Magazine attempted to get to grips with the burgeoning computer revolution (‘Computer Takeover’).

‘What then is a computer?’ asked John Davy. ‘It has been well described as an obedient, very moronic clerk with an exceptionally good memory.’ Well, we’ve all met one of those

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