Coolhunting

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University of Amsterdam’s Corentin Coulais and University of Chicago’s Vincenzo Vitelli, along with their collaborators, invented a wheel that seemingly defies physics. Dubbed “Odd Matter,” the wheel—comprised of six small motors tethered together with plastic arms and rubber bands—wiggles and gyrates to travel uphill. This writhing enables the wheel to adjust to difficult terrain despite not having any cognizance of the environment. It’s a phenomenon founded on “odd elasticity,” a property that describes how a material, once stretched or squashed in one direction, does not engender a reciprocal reaction in the other. As such, when the material undoes a deformation, it contains excess energy, allowing it to travel uphill. Scientists coupled this property with robotics, outfitting a chain of modules with a motor, sensor and microcontroller, so that each module would not respond reciprocally. This thought process combines physics and robotics to generate collective behavior in robots that are crafted from simple parts obeying simple laws. Odd Matter is just one of the latest innovations from this “Robophysics” space. Learn more at Wired.

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Design Milk

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The 8-piece collection brings new colors and materiality to the Eames catalog, marking the first Herman Miller and HAY collaboration.

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themarginalian

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The metaphysical made physical in a symphonic celebration of imagination, collaboration, and the human heart.

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quantamagazine

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Physicists have solved a key problem of robotic locomotion by revising the usual rules of interaction between simple component parts.

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Wallpaper*

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The 40th anniversary of the Memphis Group is celebrated by French brand Saint Laurent with two exhibitions at its Los Angeles and Paris concept stores

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Dezeen

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French luxury house Hermès has partnered with biomaterials company MycoWorks to reimagine its Victoria shopper in a leather alternative grown from mycelium.

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fastcompany

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To boldly sit where no one has sat before.

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Inhabitat

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Designed to give nature-lovers a relaxing, creative outlet, LEGO's Botanical Collection features flower and bonsai tree models made from plant-based plastic.

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designyoutrust

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Giving and receiving beautiful flowers is such a joy. If you’re looking for a flower gift with a difference, the LEGO Flower Bouquet is an inspired choice.

Whether you’re treating a loved one, or are looking for your next creative project, this flower bouquet model building kit lets you relax, unplug and create something wonderful. When complete, the impressive flower display brings a touch of fun and color to any room. The adjustable stems make it easy to tailor the arrangement for any vase or container.

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The Next Web

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People are increasingly aware of the harm plastic waste causes to wildlife, and many would avoid buying single-use plastics if they could help it. But are the alternatives to plastic much better?

Let’s look at one example – fizzy drinks. You might assume that plastic bottles are the least green option, but is that always the case?

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