TED

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What if tiny microparticles could help us solve the world's biggest problems in a matter of minutes? That's the promise — and magic — of quantum computers, says Matt Langione. Speaking next to an actual IBM quantum computer, he explains how these machines solve complex challenges like developing vaccines and calculating financial risk in an entirely new way that's exponentially faster than the best supercomputers — and shares why industries should prepare now for this new leap in computing.

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This is Colossal

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It's easy to forget that the mounds of snow lining sidewalks each winter actually are comprised of billions of tiny crystals with individual grooves and feathered offshoots. A trio of photographs taken by Nathan Myhrvold, though, serves as a stunning reminder of that fact as they expose the intricac

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Google

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In 2010, when scientists were preparing to smash the first particles together within the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), sections of the media fantasized that the EU-wide experiment might create a black hole that could swallow and destroy our planet. How on Earth, columnists fumed, could scientists justify such a dangerous indulgence in the pursuit of abstract, theoretical knowledge?

But particle accelerators are much more than enormous toys for scientists to play with. They have practical uses too, though their sheer size has, so far, prevented their widespread use. Now, as part of large-scale European collaboration, my team has published a report that explains in detail how a far smaller particle accelerator could be built – closer to the size of a large room, rather than a large city.

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Wired

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One day a “magic carpet” based on this light-induced flow technology could carry climate sensors high in the atmosphere—wind permitting.

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Wired

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If everyone went 100 percent geothermal today, Earth’s store of thermal energy would still outlive the sun.

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Wired

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In everyday life, stillness is an illusion. Not so in this lab, where scientists rendered an object as motionless as the laws of physics permit.

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Inhabitat

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Researchers have found a way to turn common trash, like coffee grounds, food scraps and plastic waste, into graphene. Learn more about this breakthrough study.

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The Next Web

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In 1900, so the story goes, prominent physicist Lord Kelvin addressed the British Association for the Advancement of Science with these words: “There is nothing new to be discovered in physics now.” How wrong he was. The following century completely turned physics on its head. A huge number of theoretical and experimental discoveries have transformed …

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BBC

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Scientists say we are close to making fusion power a reality – but will it arrive in time to combat climate change?

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The Guardian

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The long read: Calculating the patterns and cycles of the past could lead us to a better understanding of history. Could it also help us prevent a looming crisis?

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The Guardian

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In monumental, vertiginous landscapes encrusted with mud and twigs and bloody axes, Kiefer confronts the mystery of existence and the enduring horror of the Holocaust

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