This is Colossal

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Approach the delicate glass artworks by Rui Sasaki, and witness the unpredictable patterns of the weather through a subtle glow of blue light. The Japanese artist’s experiential body of work translates varying forecasts into speckled sculptures that radiate once encountered, an intimate process that Sasaki describes as a way to “visualize subtle sunshine, record today’s weather, and transfer it from here to there/from there to here.”

View Original from This is Colossal

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

lithub

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

She was born in Japan in 1949. After graduating high school, she moved to Tokyo, where she worked as a bar hostess. She appeared in a few “pink films”—an arty subgenre of sexploitation cinema—directed by Kōji Wakamatsu, among others, and posed for the erotic art photographer Nobuyoshi Araki before devoting herself to writing full time. In 1973, she married the free jazz saxophonist Kaoru Abe, with whom she had a daughter; Abe died of a drug overdose in 1978, one year after their divorce. She was extremely productive in the years after his death, writing short stories, novels, and essays. She took her own life in 1986 at the age of 36.

This is, by and large, the sum total of biographical information readily available to English-language readers on the subject of Izumi Suzuki, a pioneering writer of science fiction whose first collection of stories to appear in English, Terminal Boredom, is available now from Verso. Perhaps unsurprisingly, there is much more information available in English about the male artists with whom she lived and worked; her own life tends to be talked about in relation to theirs, when it is talked about at all. With the publication of Terminal Boredom, English-language readers will be able to discover Suzuki in her own right. So who was she, anyway, and what of the work she left behind?

View Original from lithub

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Design Week

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Less But Better has been curated and designed by London-based Systems Studio and aims to introduce the German designer’s work to “new audiences”.

View Original from Design Week

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Design Boom

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

NIKKEN SEKKEI has renovated the ARAKAWA office building on a prominent corner plot in nishi-shinbashi, tokyo's historic business district.

View Original from Design Boom

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Dezeen

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Swiss brand Freitag has created a shop in Zurich, which is a “micro-factory” where customers can help make their own bag out of recycled tarpaulins.

View Original from Dezeen

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

The Guardian

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

In its magazine format it lasted 37 years, criticising architecture and design with true energy. Now it is online only

View Original from The Guardian

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

It's Nice That

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Based on the shapes of sailing, cycling, athletics, gymnastics, rowing and swimming, the six prints hark back to iconic Olympic designs of the 1960s.

View Original from It's Nice That

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Design Boom

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

denpaku the beachfront mijora by atelier tekuto and amami design firm is a complex of thirteen origami-like concrete villas in the amami archipelago, japan.

View Original from Design Boom

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Design Boom

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

tatzu nishi is the subject of a solo exhibition at ANOMALY in tokyo titled 'the real reasons for unbreakable habits and how to deal with them'.

View Original from Design Boom

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment