whatdesigncando

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“I see beauty in data,” says Giorgia Lupi, whose unique approach to information design is making…

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It's Nice That

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This month we’re looking at sites which nail their mobile version, or which are mobile only!

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Wired

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Technology should focus on the complementarity game, not the imitation game.

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phototraces

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Known as the Supreme Master of Landscape Photography, Ansel Adams is by far the most important name among famous landscape photographers.

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Core 77

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Researchers at the Australian National University have developed a thin film “that allows people to see clearly in the dark” when they look through it. The film contains nanometre-scale crystals that enable the magic-like feat. Dr Rocio Camacho Morales “We have made the invisible visible,” lead researcher Dr

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Design Boom

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'petit market' by nendo is an adjustable roadside vegetable stand that promotes the spread of cheap and fresh agricultural products.

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This is Colossal

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Approach the delicate glass artworks by Rui Sasaki, and witness the unpredictable patterns of the weather through a subtle glow of blue light. The Japanese artist’s experiential body of work translates varying forecasts into speckled sculptures that radiate once encountered, an intimate process that Sasaki describes as a way to “visualize subtle sunshine, record today’s weather, and transfer it from here to there/from there to here.”

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wptavern

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The Creative Commons search engine will soon be part of WordPress.org, as Automattic will begin sponsoring several members of the CC Search team to maintain it. The engine currently offers over 500 million images, audio, and videos, under Creative Commons licenses or the public domain, aggregating more than 45 different sources.

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Lifehacker

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As a pet owner, you’ve likely come home or woken up to find some evidence of late-night shenanigans around your living space. Fortunately, though, if you’d like to set up some quick surveillance for a particular area (maybe you have nosy roommates, or you’re going out of town and are feeling paranoid), you can check out the website critter.camera.

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monakuhn

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Mona Kuhn is best known for her large-scale photographs of the human form. Her approach is unusual in that she develops close relationships with her subjects, resulting in images of remarkable intimacy, and creating the effect of people naked but comfortable in their own skin. In addition, Kuhn's playful combination of visual strategies, such as translucency explores our connectedness with the environment. A sublime sense of comfort and intelligence permeates her works, showing the human body in its most natural state while simultaneously re-envisioning the nude as a contemporary canon of art.

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The Guardian

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Creative giants from Hirst to Hambling have produced masterpieces a few centimetres across for a scaled-down show

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fastcompany

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To boldly sit where no one has sat before.

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The Guardian

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From A1 road trips to the abandoned north, these images from the Martin Parr Foundation tell a story of the nation … and photography itself

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The Guardian

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While enjoying an idyllic lockdown in France, the 83-year-old artist has created perhaps his most important exhibition ever – offering hope to an injured world

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This is Colossal

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Scan the World might be one of the only institutions where visitors are encouraged to handle the most-valued sculptures and artifacts from art history. The open-source museum hosts an impressive archive of 18,000 digital scans—the eclectic collection spans artworks like the “Bust of Nefertiti,” the “Fourth Gate of Vaubam Fortress,” Rodin’s “The Thinker,” and Michelangelo’s “David” in addition to other items like chimpanzee skulls—that are available for download and 3D printing in a matter of hours.

Searchable by collection, artist, and location, Scan the World recently teamed up with Google Arts and Culture, which partners with more than 2,000 institutions, to add thousands of additional pieces to the platform. Each page shares information about an artifact’s history and location, in addition to technical details like dimensions, complexity, and time to print—scroll down on to view images of finished pieces uploaded by the community, too. While much of the collection focuses on Western art, it’s currently bolstering two sections that explore works from India and China.

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