blinkist

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Meet Blinkist, a Berlin-based, award-winning startup that improves millions of people’s lives on a daily basis.

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This is Colossal

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Scan the World might be one of the only institutions where visitors are encouraged to handle the most-valued sculptures and artifacts from art history. The open-source museum hosts an impressive archive of 18,000 digital scans—the eclectic collection spans artworks like the “Bust of Nefertiti,” the “Fourth Gate of Vaubam Fortress,” Rodin’s “The Thinker,” and Michelangelo’s “David” in addition to other items like chimpanzee skulls—that are available for download and 3D printing in a matter of hours.

Searchable by collection, artist, and location, Scan the World recently teamed up with Google Arts and Culture, which partners with more than 2,000 institutions, to add thousands of additional pieces to the platform. Each page shares information about an artifact’s history and location, in addition to technical details like dimensions, complexity, and time to print—scroll down on to view images of finished pieces uploaded by the community, too. While much of the collection focuses on Western art, it’s currently bolstering two sections that explore works from India and China.

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Lifehacker

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Many people require the aid of specialized speech devices to communicate with their family, friends, and caregivers. Some of these machines are operated through eye-tracking, which allows the users to quickly “type” sentences or select phrases without touch or voice controls—but not everyone has access to such devices.

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blog

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The National Gallery of Rome’s program, Women Up, brings together works by women artists–showing the representation of women while also underscoring the damage done by residual stereotypes.

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The Next Web

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The joy of coding Python should be in seeing short, concise, readable classes that express a lot of action in a small amount of clear code — not in reams of trivial code that bores the reader to death. – Guido van Rossum Python is one of the most used programming languages in the world, and that can …

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The Next Web

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If you’ve used Google Maps for any length of time, you’ve probably noticed an occasional quirk: unless you’re using the satellite view, the colors of the maps don’t necessarily reflect the natural features of the real world. Sure, streets and corners will be where they are supposed to be, but ‘green’ areas marked as parks …

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Smashing Magazine

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The dream of a machine-readable Internet is as old as the Internet itself, but only in recent years has it really seemed possible. As major websites take strides towards data-fying their content, now’s the perfect time to jump on the bandwagon.

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Ars Technica

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Technique allows for real-time listening in on a room hundreds of feet away.

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The Next Web

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How did the big consumer apps get their first 1,000 users? Considering every startup confronts this question at some point, I was surprised by how little has been written about it. Particularly anything actionable. So I decided to do my own digging. I spent the past month personally reaching out to founders, scouring interviews, and tapping the Twitterverse.

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Lifehacker

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Google Lens has let users scan, save, and translate text using their smartphone cameras for years, but recent updates have added new features like text-to-speech narration, barcode scanning, and, as of the most recent update, the ability to snap photos of text—including hand-written text—and send the translated results directly to your PC.

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The Next Web

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If you’re regularly working with data, but lack the interest, financial means, or need for a fancy data management platform, there’s no need to panic. As we’ve shown throughout this series of articles, good old Google Sheets is capable of a lot more than you might realize.

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labnol

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Google Photos is the best service for backing up your digital photos to the cloud. They have no storage restrictions, you can upload images as well as videos, and the built-in visual search engine helps you find photos by faces or objects in the picture. There’s one feature though that’s still missing in Google Photos.

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Google

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Google Search puts the world’s information at your fingertips, helping people find helpful results for billions of queries every day. From ranking systems to features that show up when you search, this series explains what makes Google useful and how we connect you to the information you’re looking for.

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The Next Web

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Image compression has been one of the constantly evolving challenges in computer science. Programers and researchers are always trying to improve current standards or create new ones to get better image quality at a lower size.

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