wptavern

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The Creative Commons search engine will soon be part of WordPress.org, as Automattic will begin sponsoring several members of the CC Search team to maintain it. The engine currently offers over 500 million images, audio, and videos, under Creative Commons licenses or the public domain, aggregating more than 45 different sources.

View Original from wptavern

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

blinkist

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Meet Blinkist, a Berlin-based, award-winning startup that improves millions of people’s lives on a daily basis.

View Original from blinkist

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

lithub

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

She was born in Japan in 1949. After graduating high school, she moved to Tokyo, where she worked as a bar hostess. She appeared in a few “pink films”—an arty subgenre of sexploitation cinema—directed by Kōji Wakamatsu, among others, and posed for the erotic art photographer Nobuyoshi Araki before devoting herself to writing full time. In 1973, she married the free jazz saxophonist Kaoru Abe, with whom she had a daughter; Abe died of a drug overdose in 1978, one year after their divorce. She was extremely productive in the years after his death, writing short stories, novels, and essays. She took her own life in 1986 at the age of 36.

This is, by and large, the sum total of biographical information readily available to English-language readers on the subject of Izumi Suzuki, a pioneering writer of science fiction whose first collection of stories to appear in English, Terminal Boredom, is available now from Verso. Perhaps unsurprisingly, there is much more information available in English about the male artists with whom she lived and worked; her own life tends to be talked about in relation to theirs, when it is talked about at all. With the publication of Terminal Boredom, English-language readers will be able to discover Suzuki in her own right. So who was she, anyway, and what of the work she left behind?

View Original from lithub

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

fastcompany

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

To boldly sit where no one has sat before.

View Original from fastcompany

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Creative Applications

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Created by Artem Stepanchuk, ‘The Transcriptions of Space’ is an experimental application (PWA) developed using deep learning algorithms that demonstrates the ability of artificial intelligence to realize the inherent human creativity.

View Original from Creative Applications

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

The Guardian

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

On the eve of series two of their lockdown-inspiration art club, the couple talk about hitting their 60s, therapy… and Grayson’s missing alter ego

View Original from The Guardian

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

BBC

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

For decades Antarctica hosted only the simplest huts as human shelters – but architecture in the coldest, driest, windiest continent is getting snazzier.

View Original from BBC

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

99 designs

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Here are the recommended social media image sizes and dimensions in 2021 for Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest and YouTube.

View Original from 99 designs

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

The Guardian

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights and hidden gems from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Guildford’s De Morgan Collection’s Lux in Tenebris.

View Original from The Guardian

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Ars Technica

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The American 19th century entrepreneur Thomas Edison is perhaps most famous for his development of the incandescent light bulb, but few people likely know that part of his inspiration came from an obscure fellow inventor in Connecticut named William Wallace. Edison visited Wallace’s workshop on September 8, 1878, to check out the latter’s prototype “arc light” system. Edison was impressed, but he thought he could improve on the system, which used a steam-powered dynamo to produce an incredibly bright light—much too bright for household use, more akin to outdoor floodlights. The result was the gentle glow of the incandescent bulb.

View Original from Ars Technica

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

The Next Web

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

A new study has shown a way to make wood transparent without using huge amounts of energy in the process.

View Original from The Next Web

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Inhabitat

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Austin-based Mckinney York Architects has completed its second micro-house for the Community First! Village, a program by Mobile Loaves & Fishes to uplift people experiencing chronic homelessness in Austin with affordable, sustainable tiny homes. As with the firm’s first project for the community, Mckinney York Architects teamed up with Bailey Eliot Construction to design, underwrite and build a permanent new home for a Community First! resident.

View Original from Inhabitat

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

It's Nice That

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Pokémon, peaches and process: Yuxin demonstrates the future of a young, multidisciplinary design practice through her refreshing combination of academia and gaiety.

View Original from It's Nice That

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

fastcompany

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

COVID-19 has closed workplaces across the U.S., and the luckiest among us may never be forced to return to an office again. That’s an intriguing option for people who can suddenly log in from anywhere. And now, the nation’s most storied and shiny RV brand, Airstream, plans to seize this moment with a brand-new trailer optimized for working on the go.

View Original from fastcompany

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment