This is Colossal

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Using the Brico System for letterpress printing requires thinking of every possible combination from A to Z. The simple method involves just four shapes to create typographic forms and geometric renderings, and it founded a recent collaboration between artist and printmaker Anthony Burrill, designer and printer Thomas Mayo, and Oli Bently, who helms the Leeds-based studio Split and the People Powered Press, a non-profit printer that’s the largest letterpress operation of its kind in the world.

Together, the trio created one monochromatic print of every letter, which span 1.5 meters. “With near endless possibilities of letter forms, weights, sizes, and styles, it was created so that anyone can share in the joy of type design,” they say.

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The Guardian

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On the eve of series two of their lockdown-inspiration art club, the couple talk about hitting their 60s, therapy… and Grayson’s missing alter ego

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It's Nice That

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For the directors behind Headspace Guide to Meditation, it was a challenge unlike any other. So just how have they envisaged inner calm for a streaming audience?

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It's Nice That

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Pokémon, peaches and process: Yuxin demonstrates the future of a young, multidisciplinary design practice through her refreshing combination of academia and gaiety.

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This is Colossal

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Swollen, glistening, and saturated with illusion, the ubiquitous water drop absorbed Kim Tschang-Yeul throughout his career. The Korean artist, who died earlier this year, was faithful to the seemingly mundane subject matter, choosing to depict the dewy orbs repeatedly after an initial painting in 1972 following his relocation to France. Inspired originally by a water-soaked canvas in his studio, Kim nurtured the viscous element in his hyperrealistic paintings created across nearly five decades. In an essay about the artist’s unending commitment, Dr. Cleo Roberts writes:

It is a tendency that seems to unite many of Korea’s avant-garde who took from Art Informel in the early ‘60s, including Ha Chong-Hyun and Park Seo-Bo. In this generation of artists, there is a ritualistic devotion to a chosen form, process, and, at times, colour. One could venture that, in the context of living in a volatile country ravaged by war, the security of immersion in a singular mode was an empowering choice, and may have been a necessary psychological counterpoint.

Whether depicting a singular pendant-shaped drop or canvas strewn with perfectly round bulbs, each of the oil-based works exhibits a deft approach to shadow and texture. The bloated forms appear to bead on the surface and are imbued with a sense of impermanence: if disturbed by even a small movement, they look as if they could burst or run down the surface.

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This is Colossal

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While traditional wood and velvet-lined caskets can take more than a decade to decompose in the earth, a new design by Bob Hendrikx is an environmentally friendly alternative that replenishes the soil. Breaking down in just two to three years, “The Living Cocoon” is composed entirely of mycelium, th

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Design Boom

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IN studio has built this japanese house with a diagonal façade, which ensures great views of the valley and hills that extend in front of the property.

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Design Boom

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teetering over a rocky cliff edge, this concept by yakusha design imagines an exposed and minimal holiday home for a surfer.

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adobe

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A how-to guide for planning and facilitating online workshops and events, with reflections and resources from Priya Parker, CreativeMornings, and others.

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ilovetypography

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Robert Granjon lived in the 1500s. The new style of typeface he invented in 1557, modeled on contemporary Gothic cursive handwriting, and later came to be know as Civilité, after the Civilité of 'etiquette' books that the typeface often appeared in. Although Granjon really anted his Civilité to become the national typeface of France. However, it never really caught on, and could compete with Roman and Italic fonts.

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