lithub

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

She was born in Japan in 1949. After graduating high school, she moved to Tokyo, where she worked as a bar hostess. She appeared in a few “pink films”—an arty subgenre of sexploitation cinema—directed by Kōji Wakamatsu, among others, and posed for the erotic art photographer Nobuyoshi Araki before devoting herself to writing full time. In 1973, she married the free jazz saxophonist Kaoru Abe, with whom she had a daughter; Abe died of a drug overdose in 1978, one year after their divorce. She was extremely productive in the years after his death, writing short stories, novels, and essays. She took her own life in 1986 at the age of 36.

This is, by and large, the sum total of biographical information readily available to English-language readers on the subject of Izumi Suzuki, a pioneering writer of science fiction whose first collection of stories to appear in English, Terminal Boredom, is available now from Verso. Perhaps unsurprisingly, there is much more information available in English about the male artists with whom she lived and worked; her own life tends to be talked about in relation to theirs, when it is talked about at all. With the publication of Terminal Boredom, English-language readers will be able to discover Suzuki in her own right. So who was she, anyway, and what of the work she left behind?

View Original from lithub

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

The Guardian

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Creative giants from Hirst to Hambling have produced masterpieces a few centimetres across for a scaled-down show

View Original from The Guardian

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

designyoutrust

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

“Working on the Baseball Photographer Trading Cards, traveling throughout the country, my girlfriend at the time, Alison Woolpert, and I would stay at some, shall we say, “economy” motels,” writes photographer Mike Mandel.

View Original from designyoutrust

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

diyphotography

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Stereoscopic photography is a wonderful thing. Whether you’re able to use it in serious client work or not, it’s incredibly fun. It’s something I’ve been doing occasionally for years, and even recently with digital – thanks to the Weeview SID. But there’s no experience like shooting it on film. Until you’ve developed it, there’s no real way to know if you’ve got the shot or how it’s going to look. It’s an almost magical experience.

View Original from diyphotography

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Ars Technica

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The American 19th century entrepreneur Thomas Edison is perhaps most famous for his development of the incandescent light bulb, but few people likely know that part of his inspiration came from an obscure fellow inventor in Connecticut named William Wallace. Edison visited Wallace’s workshop on September 8, 1878, to check out the latter’s prototype “arc light” system. Edison was impressed, but he thought he could improve on the system, which used a steam-powered dynamo to produce an incredibly bright light—much too bright for household use, more akin to outdoor floodlights. The result was the gentle glow of the incandescent bulb.

View Original from Ars Technica

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

It's Nice That

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

For the directors behind Headspace Guide to Meditation, it was a challenge unlike any other. So just how have they envisaged inner calm for a streaming audience?

View Original from It's Nice That

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

It's Nice That

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Pokémon, peaches and process: Yuxin demonstrates the future of a young, multidisciplinary design practice through her refreshing combination of academia and gaiety.

View Original from It's Nice That

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

petapixel

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

In 2016 and again in 2018, PetaPixel featured the work of Dora Goodman, a woman who was adding hand-crafted elements to analog cameras. Fast forward to

View Original from petapixel

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

99 designs

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Getting your packaging design right is the most obvious way to stand out in a crowded marketplace. But there are many packaging types to choose from. Allow us to walk you through the different types of packaging to help you pick the right one.

View Original from 99 designs

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

It's Nice That

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The Design Museum’s 13th annual prize has 74 nominees across six categories from graphics to digital, highlighting the most innovative and provocative need-to-know projects from the past year.

View Original from It's Nice That

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

The Guardian

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The artists stood down as academicians after the gallery said it would not be hosting the show they had planned

View Original from The Guardian

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Wallpaper*

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

British-Indian sculptor Anish Kapoor reveals unseen facets of his practice in a confessional new documentary, Under the Skin 

View Original from Wallpaper*

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

designyoutrust

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining featured a very creepy hotel that was haunted. The actual hotel used for the film was represented by Timberline Lodge at Mt. Hood in Oregon and was named the fictional ‘Overlook Hotel’.

View Original from designyoutrust

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

It's Nice That

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

With a creative process rooted in moving image, Studio Airport's output is derived from a different kind of storytelling.

View Original from It's Nice That

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Coolhunting

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Free to watch for the duration of quarantine, courtesy of the Vitra Design Museum, filmmaker Heinz Bütler’s 90-minute film Chair Times: A History of Seating – From 1800 to Today.

View Original from Coolhunting

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Wallpaper*

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

We sit down (from afar) with the London-based photographer to get his take on the past life of a Brutalist icon on the cusp of transformation 

View Original from Wallpaper*

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment