thephoblographer

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Photographer Jack Simpson is a former paramedic and works to get street photographs that are influenced by his wedding work.

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Wallpaper*

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We speak to British artist Tracey Emin in her hometown of Margate, where she has created a new painting to raise funds for TKE Studios, a pioneering complex serving the next generation of radical creatives. ‘I don’t want to die being an artist that mad…

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The Guardian

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Famous for his off-kilter drawings, the artist is now appealing for used tennis balls, building useless clocks – and pulping The Da Vinci Code. He tells us why

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whatdesigncando

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“I see beauty in data,” says Giorgia Lupi, whose unique approach to information design is making…

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phototraces

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Known as the Supreme Master of Landscape Photography, Ansel Adams is by far the most important name among famous landscape photographers.

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lithub

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She was born in Japan in 1949. After graduating high school, she moved to Tokyo, where she worked as a bar hostess. She appeared in a few “pink films”—an arty subgenre of sexploitation cinema—directed by Kōji Wakamatsu, among others, and posed for the erotic art photographer Nobuyoshi Araki before devoting herself to writing full time. In 1973, she married the free jazz saxophonist Kaoru Abe, with whom she had a daughter; Abe died of a drug overdose in 1978, one year after their divorce. She was extremely productive in the years after his death, writing short stories, novels, and essays. She took her own life in 1986 at the age of 36.

This is, by and large, the sum total of biographical information readily available to English-language readers on the subject of Izumi Suzuki, a pioneering writer of science fiction whose first collection of stories to appear in English, Terminal Boredom, is available now from Verso. Perhaps unsurprisingly, there is much more information available in English about the male artists with whom she lived and worked; her own life tends to be talked about in relation to theirs, when it is talked about at all. With the publication of Terminal Boredom, English-language readers will be able to discover Suzuki in her own right. So who was she, anyway, and what of the work she left behind?

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Design Week

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Less But Better has been curated and designed by London-based Systems Studio and aims to introduce the German designer’s work to “new audiences”.

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The Guardian

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A new biography of the painter Isabel Rawsthorne highlights how talented women have often missed out on the recognition they deserved

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The Guardian

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On the eve of series two of their lockdown-inspiration art club, the couple talk about hitting their 60s, therapy… and Grayson’s missing alter ego

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The Guardian

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The artists have responded to the pandemic with comic, haunting works showing themselves being buffeted around a chaotic London. They talk about lines of coffins, illegal raves and ‘shameful’ statue-toppling.

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It's Nice That

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For the directors behind Headspace Guide to Meditation, it was a challenge unlike any other. So just how have they envisaged inner calm for a streaming audience?

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This is Colossal

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Swollen, glistening, and saturated with illusion, the ubiquitous water drop absorbed Kim Tschang-Yeul throughout his career. The Korean artist, who died earlier this year, was faithful to the seemingly mundane subject matter, choosing to depict the dewy orbs repeatedly after an initial painting in 1972 following his relocation to France. Inspired originally by a water-soaked canvas in his studio, Kim nurtured the viscous element in his hyperrealistic paintings created across nearly five decades. In an essay about the artist’s unending commitment, Dr. Cleo Roberts writes:

It is a tendency that seems to unite many of Korea’s avant-garde who took from Art Informel in the early ‘60s, including Ha Chong-Hyun and Park Seo-Bo. In this generation of artists, there is a ritualistic devotion to a chosen form, process, and, at times, colour. One could venture that, in the context of living in a volatile country ravaged by war, the security of immersion in a singular mode was an empowering choice, and may have been a necessary psychological counterpoint.

Whether depicting a singular pendant-shaped drop or canvas strewn with perfectly round bulbs, each of the oil-based works exhibits a deft approach to shadow and texture. The bloated forms appear to bead on the surface and are imbued with a sense of impermanence: if disturbed by even a small movement, they look as if they could burst or run down the surface.

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betterwebtype

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Telling font styles apart was one of the hardest things to do when I started working as a designer. Being self-taught, the only major difference I could see was that a font was either a serif or a sans-serif. But the more I explored, the more I realised how vast the universe of font styles actually is.

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The Guardian

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Locked down with your family? Want to impress the kids with a technique Canaletto used in 18th-century Venice? Our writer goes through the pinhole

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The Guardian

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Documentary on painter Keith Looby is a cautionary tale of rebellion becoming almost more important than what you stand for

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The Guardian

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American conceptual artist who cremated all his paintings in 1970 and later effaced the images of public figures with stick-on dots

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It's Nice That

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The British photographer and 2009 Prix Pictet winner has released The Meeting, a book containing over 200 portraits of modern luminaries, including Barack Obama, David Attenborough and Werner Herzog.

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