This is Colossal

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Last year, researchers released records from nearly two years of analysis of Johannes Vermeer’s most-recognized artwork, “Girl With a Pearl Earring.” While their findings didn’t include the subject’s highly sought-after identity, they did reveal that the gray backdrop is actually a dark green curtain and that the figure has eyelashes only visible with magnification. Thanks to Emilien Leonhardt and Vincent Sabatier, of Hirox Europe, we all can study the intricacies of Vermeer’s elusive work and peer directly into the paint cracks with an interactive 10-billion pixel panorama.

The duo began the undertaking to determine the surface condition of the iconic piece after multiple restorations, measure the space between the fractured pigments, and elucidate the artist’s technique. Using a custom microscope, Leonhardt and Sabatier took 9,100 photographs of the painting that were then woven together into the massive panorama. It reveals particulars down to 4.4-microns per pixel.

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This is Colossal

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Photographer Cristina Coral has an eye for subtle alterations that transform seemingly ordinary scenes into surreal images brimming with illusion. Often centered on a solitary woman, the conceptual photographs rely on texture, pattern, and the figures’ contorted poses. A limp hand protrudes from a bush, strawberry locks drape over a brocade couch, and a teacup precariously balances on a pair of feet.

Coral, who is based in Italy but frequently travels to Germany and Slovenia, currently is working on a project based on memory and what’s forgotten. The mixed-media works, some of which she’s shared on Instagram, fuse photographs and textiles in a way that allows portions of the original image to peek through.

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The Guardian

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A new biography of the painter Isabel Rawsthorne highlights how talented women have often missed out on the recognition they deserved

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This is Colossal

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Using the Brico System for letterpress printing requires thinking of every possible combination from A to Z. The simple method involves just four shapes to create typographic forms and geometric renderings, and it founded a recent collaboration between artist and printmaker Anthony Burrill, designer and printer Thomas Mayo, and Oli Bently, who helms the Leeds-based studio Split and the People Powered Press, a non-profit printer that’s the largest letterpress operation of its kind in the world.

Together, the trio created one monochromatic print of every letter, which span 1.5 meters. “With near endless possibilities of letter forms, weights, sizes, and styles, it was created so that anyone can share in the joy of type design,” they say.

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The Guardian

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On the eve of series two of their lockdown-inspiration art club, the couple talk about hitting their 60s, therapy… and Grayson’s missing alter ego

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This is Colossal

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It's easy to forget that the mounds of snow lining sidewalks each winter actually are comprised of billions of tiny crystals with individual grooves and feathered offshoots. A trio of photographs taken by Nathan Myhrvold, though, serves as a stunning reminder of that fact as they expose the intricac

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This is Colossal

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A new campaign for Amnesty International exemplifies the power of the pencil in a moving series of illustrations by Bristol-based Owen Gent. Led by creative agency Cossette, the initiative was was designed for Write for Rights, an annual effort striving to free people around the world who are imprisoned unjustly. In the last two decades, it’s proven highly effective and boasted a 75 percent success rate after helping release 127 people.

Set on bold backdrops, Gent’s illustrations each utilize an oversized pencil that stands in for a spotlight, camera flash, boat’s wake, and sound booming from a megaphone, representing the issues facing this year’s targets—read more about Melike Balkan, Özgür Gür, the El Hiblu 3, Khaled Drareni, and Nassima al-Sada on Amnesty International’s site. The poignant renderings serve “as a reminder that even the smallest gesture can have a huge impact—it can change lives,” Cossette says.

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The Guardian

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The artists have responded to the pandemic with comic, haunting works showing themselves being buffeted around a chaotic London. They talk about lines of coffins, illegal raves and ‘shameful’ statue-toppling.

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The Guardian

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An academic tells us that we will need the warmth and familiarity of reality TV to set us right post-virus. What we really need is Grayson Perry. His talent is not just good art, but the ability on his TV show, Grayson’s Art Club, to disable the “histrionic TV personality” genes of celebrity guests and make them be natural, as well as arty. Grayson and his wife, Philippa, bring warmth and inspiration. More will be needed after coronavirus.

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The Guardian

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With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights and hidden gems from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Guildford’s De Morgan Collection’s Lux in Tenebris.

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Dezeen

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Epic Games, the company behind popular online multiplayer game Fortnite, has created an app that allows designers and developers to create virtual, three-dimensional humans.

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Wallpaper*

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Contemporary craft fair Collect was founded by the British Crafts Council in 2004 as a pioneering fair for collectible craft, presenting recent work by living craftsmen, artists and designers (with some pieces created especially for the fair). The latest edition, previewed digitally in collaboration with the global online art platform Artsy, offers a glimpse into the diversity and eclectic richness of today’s craft panorama.

‘Collect has introduced and represented the very best global galleries for contemporary craft to design buyers and collectors for 17 years. Creating opportunity in the disruption of this past year has been so important, ensuring we maintain visibility for this global moment for craft in the cultural calendar. This online version of the fair will provide rich content as well as helping collectors to discover, view and purchase exceptional work from highly talented international artists,’ said the fair director, Isobel Dennis.

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blog

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The National Gallery of Rome’s program, Women Up, brings together works by women artists–showing the representation of women while also underscoring the damage done by residual stereotypes.

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It's Nice That

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For the directors behind Headspace Guide to Meditation, it was a challenge unlike any other. So just how have they envisaged inner calm for a streaming audience?

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It's Nice That

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Highlighting specific ingredients from its globally recognisable menu, the redesign hopes to showcase the brand’s “playful point-of-view”.

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