Designer Daily

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Designers like to find websites to find resources easily, Icons8 is like a designer’s paradise for that. Lunacy app: open Sketch files in Windows… for free! As a designer using Windows,…

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Hongkiat

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We live in an era where mobile devices have officially topped desktop computers for internet browsing and web design has changed accordingly. And while the technology has evolved tremendously and we are loving it, the users’ expectations have grown as well.
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wix

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As babies, we explore our surroundings, understanding how the world works. We discover the meanings of various signs and symbols, and learn how to use certain objects. Eventually, connecting an object’s appearance with what it actually does (its function) becomes second nature. Pushing a button will lead to a reaction; a handle on a drawer is there to be pulled; red means stop. And then you get to the more complex things – how do we learn how to use taps when some of them are automatic, while others require twisting, pulling, pushing or even tapping (yes, those exist and they mess with your minds!)? And even more mind boggling, how are we supposed to instinctively know what to do with those small, flat, rectangular objects they call smartphones?
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Wired

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The Future Book was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.
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Lifehacker

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Art, as we all know, is about following a set number of rules handed to you by another person. In the latest New York Magazine cover story, art critic Jerry Saltz lists 33 steps to becoming a great artist, and what’s interesting is how many don’ts he’s willing to hand out. His refreshingly specific tips are all, at some level, optional. And that is why they’re useful, if you’re trying to be more creative.
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Mashable Magazine

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Imagine someone demonstrating a jet plane 15 years before Kitty Hawk. Imagine someone demonstrating a smartphone 15 years before the first cellular networks were even launched. Imagine someone demonstrating a controlled nuclear chain reaction 15 years before Einstein formulated e=mc2.
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Hongkiat

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The context of our online interactions has dramatically changed lately, and in the recent years we have encountered a significant shift in the field of technology; Information Age has been replaced by the Experience Age.
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Hongkiat

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Children learn differently than adults, therefore if we want to teach them to code, we need to use an approach suitable to their needs. Adults’ coding courses usually start with explaining building blocks, such as data types, variables, and functions, however this teaching method doesn’t fit well with most kids.
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Creative Applications

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“In the early ’90s, engineer, designer, and executive leader John Maeda started making interactive, or what he called “reactive,” graphics in C language for the 68k Apple Macintosh. As the web started to take off in the mid-’90s, John moved to Java and in parallel joined the MIT Media Lab to recruit talent at the intersection of design and tech. Join John as he explores early work that he made for the computer back in the ’90s that doesn’t work anymore on modern computers.”
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The Next Web

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If you’re a tech junkie, you’ve inevitably thought about what it would be like to run into your future self, even just a year from now. What apps would be on your phone? How would your user experience change? What’s the next big thing you won’t be able to imagine your life without?
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