Design Boom

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

LEGO has partnered with the austrian research institute for artificial intelligence to create audio and braille building instructions.

View Original from Design Boom

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

It's Nice That

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Born and raised in Sweden, Simone has been building things since she was a child. Today, she runs a YouTube channel with nearly 2 million subscribers who eagerly anticipate her next “shitty robot”. We caught up with Simone to chat making things fail on purpose, getting bored and undergoing treatment for two brain tumours online.

View Original from It's Nice That

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Wired

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

I spent a couple weeks watching the social network's video channel. The shows there were very engaging … perhaps too engaging.

View Original from Wired

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Wired

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Consumer surveillance cameras are everywhere now, and they’re capturing moments we otherwise would never have known happened.

View Original from Wired

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

The Next Web

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

In the past couple of years, photo editing software has evolved a lot. With new AI capabilities, it’s now easier to manipulate snaps according to your need. But this new AI made by the researchers from MIT and IBM lets you add, edit, or remove an object just with a click.

View Original from The Next Web

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Hongkiat

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Today's Internet allows an array of mediums for sharing files across different platforms. However, sharing large files still has its limits. Most email

View Original from Hongkiat

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Wired

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

In 2013, a young computational biologist named Yaniv Erlich shocked the research world by showing it was possible to unmask the identities of people listed in anonymous genetic databases using only an Internet connection. Policymakers responded by restricting access to pools of anonymized biomedical genetic data. An NIH official said at the time, “The chances of this happening for most people are small, but they’re not zero.”
View Original from Wired

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

The Next Web

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The European Parliament just vote 'yes' on the most controversial parts of the new Copyright Reform — opponents fear for the free internet.

View Original from The Next Web

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Design Boom

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

dutch start-up bagtag proposes a modern solution of the constant overcrowding of the airports — the new device, which connects to your smartphone with bluetooth, lets you check in your luggage online. bagtag replaces the loose paper labels and shows your luggage information, saving your time usually spent in queues. 
View Original from Design Boom

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Google

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Google Photos just got either a bit cooler or a lot creepier, depending on how you see things. The photo-sharing service has long offered facial recognition, making it easier for users to categorize photos they upload. Today, that technology goes beyond humans and to the entire animal world. Yes, Google Photos is now able to recognize your pets—and not just that they are animals. It’s able group specific animals by name so you can keep track of individual pets.
View Original from Google

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment