The Next Web

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In the United States, and to a lesser extent around the world, we’ve been glorifying innovation for the past century or more. But if we want to create a balanced society, which can sustain itself while continuing to progress, it’s time we come to terms with the reality of innovation, and stop neglecting the other components of a productive, progressive society.
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Mashable Magazine

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Rewards app Miles credits you like an airline frequent flyer program for miles walked, biked, driven, carpooled, trained that are redeemed at businesses.

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feedproxy

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Customers, as we all know, are a fickle bunch. Considering how customer loyalty is far from abundant these days, there are many ways to lose a customer, but the biggest turn-off for today’s consumers is an experience in which friction isn’t kept to a minimum. On some level, we’ve known that for years, right? The marketplaces that are winning loyalty from today’s consumers are doing it by focusing on reducing customer friction points.
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Wallpaper*

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In a city at the top of its bar game, where to quench your thirst can be a million-dollar question. From intimate nooks to flamboyant and fun drinking dens, we raise a glass to London’s most stylish cocktail bars across the capital from Mayfair to Shor…

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Mashable Magazine

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The ridesharing company applied for a patent for a product that detects altered user state. It could make rides safer by giving drivers more information.

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Wired

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From a Las Vegas stage today, Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda asked an audience to imagine how the future of mobility could transform Burning Man. Then he put forward his own vision: the e-Palette. Like the humble slab of wood for which it's named, this electric, self-driving vehicle is versatile by design. It could be a cargo van. Or a flexible complement to an established mass transit system. Or a pizza delivery vehicle. Or, for Burners, building a temporary city in the desert with all sorts of needs, maybe a bit of everything.
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Core 77

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To kick off the New Year, frog's team has put together a comprehensive list of 12 tech trends we can expect to reign supreme in 2018, ranging from a shift in the way designers approach medical devices to more expressive hardware designs:
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Wired

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Last year was the first one in a while that made Americans stop, pause, and ask themselves if they could survive the end of the world. Whether you're a Silicon Valley billionaire or a regular schmo making minimum wage, it's worth considering a bug out bag in 2018—some insurance against the apocalypse.
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The Next Web

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Over the past few years, Apple vehemently denied that it was interested in building self-driving cars in order to keep its efforts a secret; the company confirmed it was working on autonomous tech only in June, but hadn’t shared much insight into its progress – until now.

A paper published last week by Yin Zhou and Oncel Tuzel, who are AI and machine learning researchers at the company, represents one of the first major breakthroughs we’ve seen from Apple’s self-driving project. And although it hasn’t been tested in the real world, it already seems like a notable development that could make rivals sit up and take notice.

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Wired

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Robots seem so far away. We’re so many years from Jetsons-esque machines that live among us and wash our dishes and fold our clothes. But the reality is the robots have arrived—you’re just not noticing them.

Take a robot called Tug, for instance. No, Tug can’t talk philosophy with you, and Tug can’t do your laundry. But Tug is a pioneer. Because in hospitals around the world, this robot is helping nurses and doctors care for patients by autonomously delivering food and drugs, shouldering the burden of time-consuming mundanity. And now, it’s rolling more and more into hotels, so get ready to see more of Tug.

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The Next Web

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The CEO of Nvidia, Jensen Huang, today boldly announced fully autonomous vehicles will be on the road in “no more than four years.” This may shock some, but there’s an ever-expanding list of companies in agreement. At this point, anyone who doesn’t see driverless cars as imminent is in denial.
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Mashable Magazine

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Amazon is a modern marvel. No other company in history has made the complexity of finding, buying, and shipping seem so simple. It can get just about anything in the world to your doorstep, much of it in just a couple days or even hours.

But for all its brilliance, Amazon has had trouble getting past that doorstep. It has perfected everything except for that last foot—call it the Last Foot Problem.

And it is a problem. With people now buying tons of stuff online, including pricey things like electronics and clothes, the theft of packages has become a widespread problem. A 2015 survey found 23 million people reported having packages taken from their doorstep.

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Campaign Live

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Alphabet’s growth-stage investment division, CapitalG, will lead the the investment, which comes four years after Google Ventures, which targets early stage companies, made a $250m investment in Uber.
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