Dezeen

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

A windowless wall punctured by a roof-level void projects from this steel-clad black house near Tokyo, creating a secret “exterior living room”.

View Original from Dezeen

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Wired

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

In Nihonbashi, a business district of Tokyo named for an old, beautiful bridge that has been obscured by an expressway, it is very difficult for a foreigner to get cash. When I was in Tokyo last week to give a talk, the first two ATM machines I tried refused to cooperate with my American debit cards. The third one worked, giving me large, beautifully designed ¥10,000 bills featuring a dot portrait of a somewhat glum Yukichi Fukuzawa, scholar and founder of Keio University.
View Original from Wired

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Wired

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The Future Book was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.
View Original from Wired

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

This is Colossal

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Tokyo-based photographer RK explores the far reaches of Japan, as well as neighboring Asian countries, shooting images that capture both timeless and of-the-moment scenes.  RK often includes signs of life in his landscape images, whether a fisherman casting a line beneath a vibrant Japanese maple tr

View Original from This is Colossal

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Design Boom

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

kengo kuma‘s small hut is the winning entry of this year’s g-mark japan design award in the prefabricated housing category. building on jyubako, which kuma designed in 2016, the small structure has the potential to expand, allowing for the connection of multiple huts across a site.
View Original from Design Boom

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Design Boom

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

it has become an ubiquitous fear that robots will one day take over the world. humanoid tech is growing disturbingly human and experts believe almost a third of the global workforce will be automated by 2030. a simple look at how factories are changing in the twenty-first century makes this a glimpse into the future not hard to imagine. of course there is the clever implementation of automated machinery to spare humans from potentially harmful processes, but on the flip side there is the letting go of human labor in favour of more efficient, commercially fruitful operations.
View Original from Design Boom

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Design Milk

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The Shoreditch Design Triangle is a loose association of shops, exhibitions and showrooms, united by little more than geography, but it always serves up something wonderful, and often something pretty weird too. Starting with the latter, London-based Mexican designer Fernando Laposse transformed the entrance to CitizenM’s Shoreditch hotel into Sisal Sanctum – an outdoor seating area protected by pretty gloomy looking “giant guardians” – all entirely made out of sisal, a natural fiber harvested from a species of Agave cactus found in the South of Mexico.
View Original from Design Milk

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

designyoutrust

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Welcome to Boogie’s Moscow. These are people sculpted by a brutal, concrete landscape, fighting to survive. This is a world of football hooligans, gang tattoos, boxing… Yet this is not misery porn: There is an inherent vitality in the violence–the enduring toughness–of these images. There is dynamis

View Original from designyoutrust

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Mashable Magazine

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The 2018 Winter Olympics had quite the tech spectacle with 1,200 Intel drones producing a memorable light show. However, it's likely the 2020 Tokyo Olympics won't make as big a deal for a new technological feat: widespread facial recognition for increased security.
View Original from Mashable Magazine

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Design Boom

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

issey miyake’s spring/summer 2018 window installation by we+ takes its cues from the rich nature of iceland. the tokyo-based design studio has hung 70 textile strips in ginza’s matsuya department store in colors selected from a printed series of the icelandic landscape.
View Original from Design Boom

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Dezeen

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Artist Emmanuelle Moureaux used over 100,000 paper number cut-outs to create this multihued installation designed to visualise the passing of time.

On show at the Toyama Prefectural Museum of Art and Design in Toyama, Japan, the Colour of Time installation is part of a series of exhibitions that aim to explore the different functions of materials.

View Original from Dezeen

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Dezeen

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

A Dutch company has developed technology for 3D printing floors in an endless variety of colours and patterns.

Aectual uses huge robotic 3D printers to create the framework for its sustainable floors, which it infills with terrazzo.

View Original from Dezeen

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment