Wired

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The climate crisis is rushing at us like a bullet train. We have to stop obsessing over velocity and become efficiency fanatics.

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Coolhunting

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Using existing microphone-equipped devices (like AirPods and smartphones), Kristalic is an AI-powered assistant that can record conversations throughout your work day in order to then condense them into a memory bank that can be easily searched later. The startup—founded by Techstars Seattle alum Jos van der Westhuizen—aims to extract “only the most important information from…

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Wired

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WebAssembly was created to build applications for browsers, but it's increasingly finding a home in cloud computing centers.

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The Guardian

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Government research suggests British tech ‘unicorns’ are only surpassed by US and China

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Wallpaper*

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Bill Bowerman, Nike co-founder and former University of Oregon and US Olympics track and field coach, was obsessed with finding the perfect running shoe for his athletes. He adopted the role of a mad shoe scientist in the mid 1960s, when co-founder and…

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Design Boom

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a brooklyn-based startup has come up with a portable e-motor that can be easily attached to any bicycle, instantly transforming it into an e-bike.

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Design Boom

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powered by a couple of AA batteries, CROZ reduces photography to fun, simplifying the digital camera down to a 48g device with only the essential elements.

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fastcompany

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Ikea’s innovation lab debuts SolarVille, a blockchain-powered solar microgrid, which points toward the furniture giant’s sustainability ambitions.

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Wired

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The Future Book was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.
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fastcompany

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There’s not much that hasn’t already been said of 3D printing or the predicted revolution that promised to transform manufacturing and put a MakerBot in every home. While the technology continues to evolve, with new applications like cutting-edge medical uses and building-size structures, it has yet to truly overtake industrial production in the mainstream market–though not for lack of effort.
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Dezeen

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Pentagram and Map have set out to prove that computer hardware doesn't have to be “cold dark boxes”, by designing colourful products for machine-learning technology startup Graphcore.

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Dezeen

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Dutch startup Plasticiet aims to create “something of value” from recycled plastic for use in interior and furniture design.

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The Next Web

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If you’re a tech junkie, you’ve inevitably thought about what it would be like to run into your future self, even just a year from now. What apps would be on your phone? How would your user experience change? What’s the next big thing you won’t be able to imagine your life without?
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Design Boom

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UK-based startup charge automotive has announced it is putting an all-electric mustang into production. in partnership with arrival, known for their electric trucks used by the royal mail, UPS, roborace, and michelin, the company will pack a 300-kilowatt electric motor and a 64 kilowatt-hour battery pack into classic 1960s-style mustang body shells licensed from ford. a limited edition of 499 will be available.
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fastcompany

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Now, Ikea will be inviting 20 startups to its campus for a three-month-long Ikea Bootcamp, hoping to incubate the next big breakthrough product right inside its Älmhult campus. Companies need to apply by December 31 to take part in the program, which starts in March 2019.
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The Next Web

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The problem with healthcare is simple: there’s not enough of it. In a perfect world we’d all have our own personal physicians like the Queen. But in reality, the average doctor sees thousands of patients a year. Solving this problem could take decades. Unless, of course, someone were to “hack” the system itself using artificial intelligence.
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