Wired

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If everyone went 100 percent geothermal today, Earth’s store of thermal energy would still outlive the sun.

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Design Boom

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unveiled at CES last week, arizona-based startup zero mass water has created a water-as-service model that uses a panel to create water out of thin air.

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Harmon Guest House is an impressive draw, enhanced by the locally-sourced art, fixtures + furnishings that underline the property's focus on sustainability.

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Wired

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A decades-old idea is finally getting a chance to shine—that is, a chance to send sunshine harvested by a satellite down to Earth.

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Inhabitat

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You won't believe your eyes as you watch the hills of Northern California come alive with thousands of solar-powered lights by artist Bruce Munro.

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fastcompany

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Ikea’s innovation lab debuts SolarVille, a blockchain-powered solar microgrid, which points toward the furniture giant’s sustainability ambitions.

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Wired

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Antarctica is the driest, highest, windiest, and, of course, coldest continent. Since it’s nearly uninhabitable for humans, it’s also the cleanest. That makes it the perfect place to launch an odyssey aimed at persuading people to curb their plastic-pitching habits.
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Design Boom

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the smartflower all-in-one solar energy system gives flower power a literal sense with its botanical-influenced solar panels that are sprouting up across america. the ‘plug-&-play’ home applicance, dubbed the smartflower POP, is a photovoltaic system that takes the form of a flower, with solar panel ‘petals’ that automatically unfurl when the sun rises in the morning. the device directs it’s 18 M2 solar modular fan towards the sun and begins producing electricity to power your hot shower, coffee machine, and breakfast radio. thanks to dual-axle sun tracking, the fan mores reliably along with the sun throughout the day which allows the module to produce 40 X more energy that a static solar device. 
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Inhabitat

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Playful in its design and highly functional, SunMade Cheese features a charger for flashlights, lighters, radios and even cellphones powered by mere sunlight. The device was developed by YOLK, the solar company applauded for its Kickstarter project ‘Solar Paper’ in 2015 that has sold millions of dollars worth of units worldwide. This time, it seems whimsy has struck the cutting-edge solar tech firm, which decided to express its love of cheese in this new project. Continuing its sun-charged aspirations, the group has debuted quirky, cheese-plate-shaped solar panels and cheese-shaped, solar-powered accessories with a meaningful mission to boot.
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Inhabitat

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For those looking to commune with nature, these sustainable all-glass cabins located in idyllic landscapes around New Zealand are just for you. Powered by solar energy, PurePods are tiny transparent capsules in stunningly beautiful settings far, far away from any type of human activity. This remove from civilization allows guests to sit back, relax, and completely immerse themselves in nature.
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Inhabitat

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Americans often take education for granted. Whether their children attend public or private schools, the opportunity to learn is always there, from kindergarten through high school and often beyond. Meanwhile, many children around the world can only dream of this priceless endowment. Sydney architect Stephen Collier noticed this problem and wanted to take action – so, along with various international non-profit groups, he developed School-in-a-Box, which has helped make the dream of education a reality for many children in Papua New Guinea.
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Inhabitat

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The City of London, the historic “Square Mile” central district of London, will soon switch to clean energy in a big way. Starting in October 2018, the City of London will source 100 percent of its power needs from renewable energy sources by installing solar panels on local buildings, investing in larger solar and wind projects and purchasing clean energy from the grid. Though no longer a square mile, closer now to 1.12 square miles, the City of London is a major financial center within the city and the world. Its green energy transformation sends a clear message that London intends to take strong action against climate change.
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Inhabitat

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Researchers at the University at Buffalo have created a highly efficient device that uses sunlight and black carbon-dipped paper to clean water. The paper is placed in a triangular arrangement, which enables it to vaporize and absorb water with nearly 100 percent efficiency. The simple, inexpensive technology could be deployed in regions where clean drinking water is chronically unavailable or areas that have been acutely affected by natural disasters.
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