De-milked

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Rome wasn't built in a day – much like the world-famous companies that we all recognize today. Even they had to start from something – and you might be surprised when you find out that quite a few of them started out by doing things completely different than they are doing now.

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The Guardian

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If you spend hours a day staring at your phone screen for social media, games and reading, a new no-frills device could help nudge you back to the real world

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The Next Web

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While we all know that billionaires control a substantial amount of the world’s wealth – in fact, current projections see the richest 1% controlling 2/3 of it by 2030 – what they use their vast fortunes on may surprise you.

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Wired

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The first meme of 2018 was Mariah Carey publicly complaining that, prior to her New Year’s Eve performance, no one had brought her “hot tea.” It was funny and in keeping with Carey’s legendary diva antics, but it was also a GIF-able summation of the year’s desperate need for soothing. President Trump had closed out a horribly tense first year in the White House; Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria left devastation in their wakes; a man opened fire on a Las Vegas music festival, killing dozens; North Korea was testing nuclear weapons; we learned that Hollywood (and especially Harvey Weinstein) was a sexist hotbed of sexual coercion. We all needed that hot tea. The first memes of 2019 (Chrissy Teigen getting poked in the eye with an umbrella notwithstanding) strike a markedly different tone, often displaying a desperate kind of self-actualized intention.
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Mashable Magazine

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Imagine someone demonstrating a jet plane 15 years before Kitty Hawk. Imagine someone demonstrating a smartphone 15 years before the first cellular networks were even launched. Imagine someone demonstrating a controlled nuclear chain reaction 15 years before Einstein formulated e=mc2.
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Wired

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On a recent weeknight at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art, the celebrated German designer Dieter Rams ambled up to a podium in his uniform of a black shirt, thinning silver bowl cut, and cane. He was there to introduce a movie, of which he is begrudgingly but indisputably the star.
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Dezeen

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Designers Barber and Osgerby, Konstantin Grcic and Sevil Peach explore what the office of today looks like in an exhibition for furniture brand Vitra.

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fastcompany

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With the rise of soft, cloth-coated gadgets, it’s become clear that fashion and interior design are impacting consumer electronics. But influence is a two-way street–and the design language of Silicon Valley is also influencing other design sectors. Take Pantone, which is introducing a new slew of colors, called Metallic Shimmers, for a world obsessed shine and shimmer–and where most of us drop $800 on a new phone every two years.
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Wired

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It’s too loud for me to hear inside the Cupertino coffee bar, but Achin Bhowmik says it doesn’t bother him. He’s got a superpower, he says. If I look closely—very closely—I can see the tiny plastic tubes reaching from his ear canals to small devices hidden behind his ears. The hearing aids are running machine-learning algorithms that continuously monitor his “acoustic environment” to help him hear what he wants to hear. In the coffee shop, the devices decide this is a “speech in noise” situation, and automatically dampen the sound of background chatter and espresso machines, and focus four directional mics (two in each device) to amplify my voice instead.
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fastcompany

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The world is addicted to cheap, crappy clothes. Thanks to low-wage manufacturing in poor countries and the rise of fast fashion, clothes have morphed from being valuable possessions to disposable items that we chuck out at the end of the season. And, as I recently described in a recent essay, this never-ending cycle of consumption is killing people and the planet.
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Fast.co Design

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Buzz is part blood alcohol-monitoring wearable, part Livestrong-style bracelet that aims to support consensual sex.

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The Guardian

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Google Duplex contacts hair salon and restaurant in demo, adding ‘er’ and ‘mmm-hmm’ so listeners think it’s human

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The Guardian

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai introduces a new robotic assistant, powered by Google Duplex technology, in his keynote address to Google’s 2018 conference in California on Tuesday

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The Guardian

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Google’€™s CEO, Sundar Pichai, delivers the keynote address at Google’s 2018 conference. The robotic assistant, Google Duplex, uses a very natural speech pattern that includes hesitations and affirmations such as ’€œer’€ and ’€œmmm-hmm’€ so that it is extremely difficult to distinguish from an actual human phone call

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The Guardian

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Google’€™s CEO, Sundar Pichai, delivers the keynote address at Google’s 2018 conference. The robotic assistant, Google Duplex, uses a very natural speech pattern that includes hesitations and affirmations such as ’€œer’€ and ’€œmmm-hmm’€ so that it is extremely difficult to distinguish from an actual human phone call

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