Wired

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In Nihonbashi, a business district of Tokyo named for an old, beautiful bridge that has been obscured by an expressway, it is very difficult for a foreigner to get cash. When I was in Tokyo last week to give a talk, the first two ATM machines I tried refused to cooperate with my American debit cards. The third one worked, giving me large, beautifully designed ¥10,000 bills featuring a dot portrait of a somewhat glum Yukichi Fukuzawa, scholar and founder of Keio University.
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Wired

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The Future Book was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.
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Design Boom

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designboom was recently invited to the ‘seats of power’ exhibition at VITRA design museum. currently on show in the schaudepot building, the display showcases a history of chairs and highlights the relationship between seating and expressions of authority. from mies van der rohe’s ‘barcelona chair’ to a ‘papal throne’ constructed for pope john paul II’s 1994 visit to zagreb, the chairs will be exhibited at the campus until february 17th 2019.
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fastcompany

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There’s not much that hasn’t already been said of 3D printing or the predicted revolution that promised to transform manufacturing and put a MakerBot in every home. While the technology continues to evolve, with new applications like cutting-edge medical uses and building-size structures, it has yet to truly overtake industrial production in the mainstream market–though not for lack of effort.
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Gizmodo

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There’s just something about this phone. From the moment I laid eyes on this thing, it just kind of made me happy. It’s small and adorable like a newborn puppy, and despite how petite it appears it photos, it looks and feels even smaller in person. And I’m not the only one that had this reaction. When I brought it into the office, people crowded around marveled. One person cooed at it, another said, “it’s perfect,” while a third remarked that this is the exact sort of thing they’d wished someone would make for years.

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Campaign Live

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A basement bursting with music and dining experiences, a candy-pink faux launderette, a Vogue photo shoot, intriguing installations and Instagram-friendly moments at every point, not to mention a slide in place of an escalator: welcome to the "Curiosity Rooms", where Google has chosen to promote its latest smartphone Pixel 3.
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Dezeen

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Clay, granite and timber appear throughout this ceramics store in Brittany, France, which connects to a Japan-inspired restaurant next door.

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Dezeen

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A pair of neon eyes stare out from the back of eyewear brand Ace & Tate's new Soho store, which creative agency Anyways have designed in reference to the area's risqué past.

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Campaign Live

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Instagram: increasingly popular as a shopping channel A major study of consumers across the globe has found that 42% are now using social media as their primary method of researching brands, products and services, up from 30% three years ago.
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Dezeen

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Design is a key driver of business success, according to management consultancy McKinsey's “The Business Value of Design” report.

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Core 77

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In last week's "Currently Crowdfunding: Notable Campaigns of the Week" we printed a brief mention of the Herston self-balancing desk lamp, but it's such a kick-ass design that we want to take a closer look at it here. A task lamp is one of the most important things you can have on your desk, and the Herston, by industrial designers Oliver and Greta Chambers, is a clear improvement over what came before.
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Design Boom

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it has become an ubiquitous fear that robots will one day take over the world. humanoid tech is growing disturbingly human and experts believe almost a third of the global workforce will be automated by 2030. a simple look at how factories are changing in the twenty-first century makes this a glimpse into the future not hard to imagine. of course there is the clever implementation of automated machinery to spare humans from potentially harmful processes, but on the flip side there is the letting go of human labor in favour of more efficient, commercially fruitful operations.
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Packaging of the World

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Coffee Bar acts as a point of difference to other coffee scrubs in the market that takes messy coffee scrubs and compresses it into a bar. As simple as that. We decided to position the brand as a clean, simple and easy to use product, and expressed that through the design. The design draws on the square form the bar and the clean and compact form.

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