fastcompany

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That number may seem small compared to Chicago or Los Angeles, both of which have vacant lots numbers in the tens of thousands, according to estimates. But for a city gripped by a perpetual and worsening affordable housing crisis–and an administration that plans to build 300,000 units of affordable housing in the next decade–it’s large enough to spur a debate around how the city should be handling these vacant spaces.
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Web Urbanist

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There’s something extra eerie about places that are not quite abandoned just yet, but edging closer and closer to a prolonged death process. Relics of another time, these architectural remnants feel like physical connections to all the lives that passed through them, many of which have already met an end. Lacking any efforts to preserve or revive them, they slowly crumble, waiting for their inevitable demolition. Photographer Michael Eastman specializes in capturing such places on film in all their deteriorating glory.
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Dezeen

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The V&A museum has salvaged a three-storey section of Robin Hood Gardens, the much-debated brutalist social housing estate by Alison and Peter Smithson that is currently being demolished in east London.

The V&A has acquired two sections of the estate’s garden- and street-facing facades, including one of its elevated walkways that were central to the “streets in the sky” concept devised by the Smithsons.

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Google

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In January, around the time of the Women’s March on Washington, my pilates studio wrote an Audre Lorde quote on the chalkboard near the door: “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” At first it made me feel a kinship with the studio, because I like the quote and I admire Audre Lorde. But throughout the class my eyes kept wandering over to it as I tried to parse what was making me feel uneasy. I decided the quote was a ploy, a convenient way for the studio to justify a $35 exercise class. Don’t get me wrong—I believe in self care, but luxury fitness is not a radical act.

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