This is Colossal

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Approach the delicate glass artworks by Rui Sasaki, and witness the unpredictable patterns of the weather through a subtle glow of blue light. The Japanese artist’s experiential body of work translates varying forecasts into speckled sculptures that radiate once encountered, an intimate process that Sasaki describes as a way to “visualize subtle sunshine, record today’s weather, and transfer it from here to there/from there to here.”

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This is Colossal

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Next week, Magnum Photos (previously) is pulling more than 90 photographs from its archive for a print sale that pays tribute to chance moments and serendipity. The Unexpected launches March 22 with a range of compositions documenting more than seven decades worth of “under-explored issues, reportin

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fastcompany

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To boldly sit where no one has sat before.

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This is Colossal

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Scan the World might be one of the only institutions where visitors are encouraged to handle the most-valued sculptures and artifacts from art history. The open-source museum hosts an impressive archive of 18,000 digital scans—the eclectic collection spans artworks like the “Bust of Nefertiti,” the “Fourth Gate of Vaubam Fortress,” Rodin’s “The Thinker,” and Michelangelo’s “David” in addition to other items like chimpanzee skulls—that are available for download and 3D printing in a matter of hours.

Searchable by collection, artist, and location, Scan the World recently teamed up with Google Arts and Culture, which partners with more than 2,000 institutions, to add thousands of additional pieces to the platform. Each page shares information about an artifact’s history and location, in addition to technical details like dimensions, complexity, and time to print—scroll down on to view images of finished pieces uploaded by the community, too. While much of the collection focuses on Western art, it’s currently bolstering two sections that explore works from India and China.

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This is Colossal

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Photographer Cristina Coral has an eye for subtle alterations that transform seemingly ordinary scenes into surreal images brimming with illusion. Often centered on a solitary woman, the conceptual photographs rely on texture, pattern, and the figures’ contorted poses. A limp hand protrudes from a bush, strawberry locks drape over a brocade couch, and a teacup precariously balances on a pair of feet.

Coral, who is based in Italy but frequently travels to Germany and Slovenia, currently is working on a project based on memory and what’s forgotten. The mixed-media works, some of which she’s shared on Instagram, fuse photographs and textiles in a way that allows portions of the original image to peek through.

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Design Week

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Less But Better has been curated and designed by London-based Systems Studio and aims to introduce the German designer’s work to “new audiences”.

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The Guardian

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The artists have responded to the pandemic with comic, haunting works showing themselves being buffeted around a chaotic London. They talk about lines of coffins, illegal raves and ‘shameful’ statue-toppling.

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Ars Technica

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The American 19th century entrepreneur Thomas Edison is perhaps most famous for his development of the incandescent light bulb, but few people likely know that part of his inspiration came from an obscure fellow inventor in Connecticut named William Wallace. Edison visited Wallace’s workshop on September 8, 1878, to check out the latter’s prototype “arc light” system. Edison was impressed, but he thought he could improve on the system, which used a steam-powered dynamo to produce an incredibly bright light—much too bright for household use, more akin to outdoor floodlights. The result was the gentle glow of the incandescent bulb.

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blog

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The National Gallery of Rome’s program, Women Up, brings together works by women artists–showing the representation of women while also underscoring the damage done by residual stereotypes.

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This is Colossal

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A new installation by artist Chila Kumari Singh Burman masks the stately columns and ornate flourishes of Tate Britain’s facade, enveloping the London museum in a blanket of neon. In “Remembering a Brave New World,” technicolor symbols, pop culture references, and religious iconography transform the

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It's Nice That

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The Design Museum’s 13th annual prize has 74 nominees across six categories from graphics to digital, highlighting the most innovative and provocative need-to-know projects from the past year.

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The Guardian

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With London’s Victoria & Albert Museum in lockdown, its director shares his favourite artefacts

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It's Nice That

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With a creative process rooted in moving image, Studio Airport's output is derived from a different kind of storytelling.

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Coolhunting

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Free to watch for the duration of quarantine, courtesy of the Vitra Design Museum, filmmaker Heinz Bütler’s 90-minute film Chair Times: A History of Seating – From 1800 to Today.

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Design Boom

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fornasetti and the complesso monumentale della pilotta in parma present 'fornasetti theatrum mundi' exhibition from june 3, 2020, to february 14, 2021.

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designyoutrust

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The look of tool chests can tell us much about workers and workplaces. While their purpose is to organize, carry, and protect tools, this chest also suggests what a worker thinks of himself and how society measures the value of his work.

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It's Nice That

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The Dallas Museum of Art invites people worldwide to submit their own sounds to the artwork which will then be mapped onto a rendering of the globe.

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The Guardian

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American conceptual artist who cremated all his paintings in 1970 and later effaced the images of public figures with stick-on dots

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