Design Boom

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package delivery service UPS has joined forces with the world’s largest consumer product companies and international recycling leader terracycle to unveil a new system of recycling that could rid the world of plastics. the system, entitled loop encourages a reusable and returnable cycle for managing consumer product packaging that enables consumers to reduce their single-use packaging consumption.
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Dezeen

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A network of subterranean concrete galleries forms the UCCA Dune Art Museum, which OPEN Architecture has completed in Qinhuangdao, China.

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Design Boom

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history’s most famous footstep: neil armstrong’s ‘one small step’ was the result of big engineering. all parts of the spacesuits, including the boots, needed to be perfect and this means that models deemed unfit were rejected, even for the smallest reasons. mobility and fit are extremely important in keeping astronauts productive, so NASA has been focusing on space wear designs to help crews work more efficiently and safely during spacewalks.
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Wired

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One of my favorite classes to teach is Physics for Elementary Education. It's a physics class designed to address the needs of future elementary school teachers—grades 1 through 6 or so. To guide the class, I've been using a version of Next Gen Physical Science and Everyday Thinking for a long time, maybe 13 years or so, and it is super awesome.
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fastcompany

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Working with Dutch studio Scholten & Baijings—known for bringing a conceptual, candy-colored touch to established modern brands like Herman Miller, Maharam, and HAY—Ikea invited the designers to revisit a few of its salient classics. The studio’s limited-edition collection, Lyskaft (Swedish for “Luminosity”) brings a refreshed, edited take on the ubiquitous Poang lounge chair and Klippan sofa, with features that include new colored, textured seat covers and geometric, screw-on sofa legs that one might normally seek out on a site like Pretty Pegs, Bemz, or any number of cottage-industry specialists that have made a business model of selling niche, Ikea-specific accessories.
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Mashable Magazine

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Move over, black and white x-rays. New Zealand company MARS Bioimaging has developed the world's first full-color, 3D X-rays, using CERN technology.

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Wired

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Last week, SpaceX realized a decade-long dream of successfully launching the most powerful rocket in the world. The Falcon Heavy’s achievement, marked resoundingly with thunderous sonic booms following twin booster touchdowns at Cape Canaveral, was only upstaged by Starman—a doomed mannequin at the wheel of Elon Musk’s Roadster
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Wired

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Locked away beneath the surface of Mars are vast quantities of water ice. But the properties of that ice—how pure it is, how deep it goes, what shape it takes—remain a mystery to planetary geologists. Those things matter to mission planners, too: Future visitors to Mars, be they short-term sojourners or long-term settlers, will need to understand the planet's subsurface ice reserves if they want to mine it for drinking, growing crops, or converting into hydrogen for fuel.
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Dezeen

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This year saw a bumper crop of conceptual towers unveiled, in addition to the plethora of completed skyscrapers. Architecture editor Jessica Mairs continues our review of the year with her pick of the best fantasy towers, from plant-covered high-rises on Mars to a vertical farm in Africa.
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Smashing Magazine

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The classic definition of a prototype is that it is a scale demo of a full-scale thing you want to make. A prototype might be partially built or designed to showcase a particular feature of a bigger system. This is a pretty good definition, but I like to think of prototypes as something even broader. My definition of a prototype? It’s a tangible artifact that explores an idea.

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The Independent

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A moon in our own solar system might support life, according to scientists.

Europa, which orbits around Jupiter, looks cold and desolate. But strange activity appears to be happening under its surface – which could indicate that it would be hospitable to aliens, according to scientists who study it.

Researchers say they have found evidence that there are sliding tectonic plates underneath the moon’s ice shell. The presence of such activity could have important implications for the possibility of life in the sea that scientists think is hiding underneath the crust that covers it.

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Wired

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Inventor and author Ray Kurzweil, who currently runs a group at Google writing automatic responses to your emails in cooperation with the Gmail team, recently talked with WIRED Editor-in-Chief Nicholas Thompson at the Council on Foreign Relations. Here’s an edited transcript of that conversation.

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Wired

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The blue area of this crater on Mars shows a region that’s being actively eroded away by Martian winds. The small dunes, in the bottom part of the frame, are likely being fed by the eroded slopes of the crater. Scientists are still unsure where the most of the grains of sand are coming from on Mars, and with photos like this from the camera-toting Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, they’re a bit closer to solving the puzzle.

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Wired

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Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town of Cherokee, North Carolina, attending Western Carolina University on a football scholarship. He was the first member of his family to go to college.

McCoy’s father had ruined his body as a miner, digging tunnels underneath lakes and riverbeds, and his son had developed a faith that college would lead him in a better direction. So McCoy was determined to stay in school when Spencer came along. Between fatherhood, football practice, and classes, though, he couldn’t squeeze in much part-time work. Michelle had taken an entry-level job as a teacher’s aide at a local childcare center right out of high school, but her salary wasn’t enough to support the three of them.

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