This is Colossal

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When traveling, it is a given that I will visit at least one museum dedicated to art. Most often it is someplace new—either an institution that has previously escaped my radar, or one that belongs to a city I have not yet explored. Although I enjoy viewing institutional collections, I am perhaps mos

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Wired

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In Nihonbashi, a business district of Tokyo named for an old, beautiful bridge that has been obscured by an expressway, it is very difficult for a foreigner to get cash. When I was in Tokyo last week to give a talk, the first two ATM machines I tried refused to cooperate with my American debit cards. The third one worked, giving me large, beautifully designed ¥10,000 bills featuring a dot portrait of a somewhat glum Yukichi Fukuzawa, scholar and founder of Keio University.
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Wired

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The Future Book was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.
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Colourlovers

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Most popular colors in every decade of mankind are reflecting on our habits and our needs, the development of different industries, changes within our lifestyles, global politics and economy. With the fast development of technology all around us, revolutions are made in almost every segment of human life - music, film industry, cartoons, games, nightlife, food industry, the sex industry, and many others.
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This is Colossal

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Tokyo-based photographer RK explores the far reaches of Japan, as well as neighboring Asian countries, shooting images that capture both timeless and of-the-moment scenes.  RK often includes signs of life in his landscape images, whether a fisherman casting a line beneath a vibrant Japanese maple tr

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Mashable Magazine

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Imagine someone demonstrating a jet plane 15 years before Kitty Hawk. Imagine someone demonstrating a smartphone 15 years before the first cellular networks were even launched. Imagine someone demonstrating a controlled nuclear chain reaction 15 years before Einstein formulated e=mc2.
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Design Boom

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kengo kuma‘s small hut is the winning entry of this year’s g-mark japan design award in the prefabricated housing category. building on jyubako, which kuma designed in 2016, the small structure has the potential to expand, allowing for the connection of multiple huts across a site.
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Dezeen

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Clay, granite and timber appear throughout this ceramics store in Brittany, France, which connects to a Japan-inspired restaurant next door.

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Design Boom

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studio velocity embarked on the design of the kowa apartments with the aim of rebuilding a housing complex in mihama, a seaside town on the southern tip of a peninsula in japan’s aichi prefecture. as the site’s pre-existing, 1950s-era apartment building was facing such issues as structural failure and decline in occupation, the studio resolved to replace the unusable structure with an open, friendly complex of spaces for multi-generational families. while the number of apartments was reduced in the new plan, an ambiguous boundary between public and private spaces promotes engagement between neighbors. 
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Web Urbanist

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A little bit Dada, a little bit “only sold on television,” intentionally useless inventions called Chindogu look like a bunch of plastic junk at first glance, but there’s more to it tha…

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Ars Technica

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Even modest warming leads to more drought and excessive heat for barley crops.

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Designer Daily

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Even if you love typography, there are chances that you don’t know Takenobu Igarashi yet. The Japanese designer is more famous in his home country, but his work is definitively worth a look. …

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Design Boom

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it has become an ubiquitous fear that robots will one day take over the world. humanoid tech is growing disturbingly human and experts believe almost a third of the global workforce will be automated by 2030. a simple look at how factories are changing in the twenty-first century makes this a glimpse into the future not hard to imagine. of course there is the clever implementation of automated machinery to spare humans from potentially harmful processes, but on the flip side there is the letting go of human labor in favour of more efficient, commercially fruitful operations.
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Wired

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An embryo starts out as just a single cell. It’s not long before it divides into two cells, then four, then eight, and so on — a process marked by rapid growth, in which these early, unspecialized cells proliferate wildly to start building all the tissues of the body. As development proceeds, these embryonic (and later fetal) stem cells become more specialized, differentiating into the precursors of various cell lineages, which in turn give rise to more mature cells: blood cells, nerve cells, muscle cells, intestinal cells. Major functional changes in these tissues continue to take place after birth, as the organism adapts to life outside the uterus, for the first time using its lungs to breathe air and its digestive system to process food.
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Core 77

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Take a trip to virtually any region of Japan and you'll see plenty of mamachari; translated as "mom's bike," mamachari are no-frills utility bicycles with a handy basket used as grocery getters, kiddie haulers and commuter vehicles.
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Design Boom

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MAD architects restores the kiyotsu gorge tunnel with artistic spaces for this year’s echigo-tsumari triennale in japan. ‘tunnel of light’ draws on five elements of nature — wood, earth, metal,fire, and water — to transform the historic space through several architectural installations and artistic atmospheres. each one of the installations demonstrates how art and nature can come together to reinvigorate a community while forming a poetic space where visitors transcend the role of observer, and become active participants.
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De-milked

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Most of us love Lego – probably because you can build anything you can imagine with those little bricks. If you’ve ever had Lego’s as a kid, you’ve probably built some small cars or little houses. Well, a couple of guys in Japan decided to take building Lego’s a step further by creating something you might not ever seen before.
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