It's Nice That

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Heavy III, featuring names such as Gregory Halpern, carries on the publication's conversations between beautiful photography and engaging writing from environmental destruction to feminity.

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Creative Review

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Thames & Hudson will publish Body: The Photography Book, a collection of 360 diverse photographic representations of the thing that houses our consciousness

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brainpickings

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An elegy for the triumph of commodity over creativity.

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The Guardian

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Netflix-style subscriptions by two tech behemoths could open up gaming to millions who can’t afford pricey equipment. Watch out Microsoft and Sony

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Wired

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The Future Book was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.
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Dezeen

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The “ingenious” O-Wind Turbine designed by UK students Nicolas Orellana and Yaseen Noorani has named the winner of his international James Dyson Awards.

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Web Urbanist

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A little bit Dada, a little bit “only sold on television,” intentionally useless inventions called Chindogu look like a bunch of plastic junk at first glance, but there’s more to it tha…

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Wired

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Polytetrafluoroethylene will not dissolve in acetone or ether or concentrated sulfuric acid. When Roy Plunkett first found it coating some storage canisters in 1938, he tried to destroy the substance with just about every technique known to science. A young employee at DuPont, Plunkett had been hired to develop a new refrigerant. But when he cooled and compressed a gas he was testing, a waxy white powder unexpectedly formed—that stuff he couldn’t eradicate. The material was brought to the attention of US Army general Leslie Groves, director of the Manhattan Project, who commissioned DuPont to design a plant that used polytetrafluoroethylene seals and gaskets. (The noxious chemicals needed to produce weapons-grade uranium corroded virtually every other material.) When Plunkett’s invention was eventually declassified after the war, DuPont gave it the consumer-friendly name Teflon and found a use more compatible with Cold War capitalism: coating pots and pans. The reason your omelet doesn’t stick to Teflon is related to the material’s imperviousness to those A-bomb ingredients. PTFE is a polymer—a long chainlike molecule—made of carbon and fluorine atoms. The fluorine bonds so strongly to the carbon backbone that other atoms can’t break in, so they simply slide across the surface. In fact, the biggest challenge is getting Teflon to adhere to the pan itself. The details of that process are held as closely as the nuclear codes.
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Pack World

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Innovation not just for innovation’s sake, but driven by unmet consumer and industry needs: That was the inspiration behind Garçon Wines’ Flat Wine Bottle for e-commerce, a uniquely shaped wine bottle that easily slides through the rectangular letterboxes found in the doors of U.K. consumers and businesses. For its ingenuity, this “flattened” 750-cL PET bottle, which not only facilitates the delivery of wine packages, but also features a number of notable sustainability improvements over round glass bottles, was recognized by Dow as a Diamond finalist in its 2018 30th Awards for Packaging Innovation.
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Core 77

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To us relatively wealthy Westerners, the obvious application for a cooler is camping. But for folks in developing nations who don't have access to refrigeration, having some means to keep food fresh is a crucial need, not a creature comfort.
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Dezeen

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An exhibit celebrating the work of late American architect-inventor Richard Buckminster Fuller opens in Los Angeles next week. Here's eight of his futuristic designs, including "autonomous" prefab houses with bulging windows, an underwater island and a pared-back rowing boat.
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Design Boom

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the bauhaus — the legendary cultural institution with a surprising present-day relevance — is now open for visitors to stay overnight. recreating an atmosphere of unrivaled creativity, everything from the floor plan and the materials, to the original furniture, has been returned to its original state. completed in 1926, the building known as the prellerhaus features 28 studios, each measuring around 20 square meters. inside, its walls guard the secrets and stories of some of its most renowned students, including josef albers, herbert beyer, marcel breuer, anni albers, and bertrand goldberg, among many others.
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This is Colossal

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Collage artist Lola Dupré (previously) continues to create mind-boggling manipulations of photographs in her surreal style. The Scotland-based artist cuts images into thousands of shards and arranges them to create her intricate collages. In rearranging the photo fragments, Dupré adds unusual elonga

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Inhabitat

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Researchers at the University at Buffalo have created a highly efficient device that uses sunlight and black carbon-dipped paper to clean water. The paper is placed in a triangular arrangement, which enables it to vaporize and absorb water with nearly 100 percent efficiency. The simple, inexpensive technology could be deployed in regions where clean drinking water is chronically unavailable or areas that have been acutely affected by natural disasters.
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