Design Boom

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last year we reported that MIT researchers were investigating how a fleet of autonomous boats could improve urban waterways in amsterdam. dubbed roboat, the research project saw the senseable city lab at MIT, directed by carlo ratti, collaborate with the amsterdam institute for advanced metropolitan solutions (AMS). together they envisioned a new kind of on-demand infrastructure comprising autonomous platforms that could combine together to form floating bridges and stages, collect waste, deliver goods, and transport people, all while collecting data about the city. 
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Creative Applications

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Created by Media & Interaction Design students at ECAL during a one week workshop led by Thibault Brevet, The Center for Counter-Productive Robotics is a collection of experiments where a robot was programmed to perform counter-productive tasks, with intention to develop a more human-centric approach to automation and robotics.
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Pack World

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To achieve its goals, Stamford, CT-based Nestlé Waters North America is expanding its relationship with supplier Plastrec and working with other suppliers to support the company’s ability to nearly quadruple its use of food-grade recycled plastic, or rPET, in less than three years.
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Pack World

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In early November, an independent London supermarket became one of the first in the world to introduce dedicated Plastic Free Zones. In February 2018, Dutch supermarket Ekoplaza opened its first store with a plastic-free aisle containing more than 700 grocery items. The idea came to Ekoplaza from the environmental group A Plastic Planet.
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Core 77

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A/D/O's Water Futures Design Challenge recently announced their 9 shortlisted finalists in all three categories: Future Systems & Infrastructure, Future Objects and Materials and Future Information and Communication. For the next phase in the competition, each finalist will be paired with a mentor that will help give suggestions and provide guidance throughout the research and development phases.
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Inhabitat

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Completed in just seven months, the Regent’s Park Open Air Theater in central London is yet another example of how prefabrication can be a fantastic solution for site-sensitive projects strapped for time. Local architecture firm Reed Watts Architects designed the theater using a lightweight cross-laminated timber (CLT) panel system. Set amidst protected Royal Parks trees, the cultural institution houses new rehearsal studios and a catering kitchen, marking the first time in the theater’s 86-year history that its operations have been brought together onto one site.
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feedproxy

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In a new partnership, Virgin Orbit and Cornwall Airport Newquay in South West England will be setting up a spaceport that offers rocket launches and passenger airline services side by side. This partnership could see the UK launch its first rocket from a plane instead of a terrestrial launchpad.

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Wallpaper*

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Wallpaper* July 2018 (W*232) opens an enquiry into what’s coming up in this new age of brutalism. We investigated the renewed interest in brutalist structures’ architectural heritage in London and wider Europe where neglected behemoths are being reboot…

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Design Boom

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japan-born and germany-based artist riku ikegaya aims at rethinking art and architecture through his exhibition ‘controllable: uncontrollable’. mediating between art and media, ikegaya allows visitors to take one of the thousands of pieces perfectly placed in the exhibition space.
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Design Boom

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Researchers from disney researchers pittsburgh and carnegie mellon university have developed wall++, a low-cost sensing approach that allows walls to become a smart infrastructure. a simple to apply treatment, wall++ challenges the inactivity of walls, turning them into a large sensor or touchpad.

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Dezeen

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OMA has completed restructured a governmental office building from the 1990s, creating all-new types of workspaces for the Dutch ministries that occupy it

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Wired

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Imagine you’re in a futuristic clinic, standing in front of a middle-aged man. One of his arms is outstretched while the other stays limp, giving him the effect of a zombie. His face droops on one side. When he speaks, it sounds like his mouth is full of marbles. You talk to him, ask him to raise that limp arm, try to figure out what’s wrong with him. If you were a doctor—and maybe you aren’t—you could save him, could figure out that this man is having a stroke and treat him in time to stop the bleeding in his brain.

There’s no stroke victim in front of you, though. The man is not real. The clinic exists only in virtual reality, and your patient is a figment of the digital world, his symptoms a mere illustration of what might happen in real life.

This experience represents one possibility for the future of healthcare, a future that telecommunications company Qualcomm is throwing its weight behind. The company created this demo using its standalone Snapdragon 835 VR platform to show what how increasingly fast and low-latency networks could bring on an entirely new kind of healthcare—one where tools like VR help doctors better understand, diagnose, and treat patients in real life.

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Wired

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The study has its origin, strangely enough, in tea. Back in 2006, researchers thought tea drinkers might have fewer heart attacks. So Kenneth Mukamal, an epidemiologist at the Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, recruited at-risk adults and told them to drink either three cups of black tea a day or three cups of water. Getting participants to stick to the program is notoriously difficult, so to make sure they were drinking their tea, Mukumal tested urine samples from a subgroup of participants for gallic acid, a tea breakdown product. After six months, they ran the numbers: Tea had virtually no effect on a person’s cardiovascular risk.

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Design Boom

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acques ferrier architecture has designed the headquarters of métropole rouen normandie, located on the banks of the seine in rouen, france. the building contains work spaces, a roof terrace, and public areas that serve as an extension of an eco-park that will eventually surround the site. the dynamic profile of the structure stands out among the buildings on the major port, acting as the figurehead for the future district.

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Design Curial

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Industrial designer Julian Maynard, of Maynard Design, talks of a childhood filled with making things. The now international practice delivers on huge-scale public realm projects, ranging from wayfinding, street furniture, competitions and massive infrastructure projects such as new railways. It’s unlikely that you’ll see a kettle or toaster in his portfolio – perhaps something his former tutors at the RCA wished they’d known about – as his interest lies more with semiotics and human behaviour while interacting with products. Nevertheless his work and approach is pioneering, and forms the foundation for his expanding practice.

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