De-milked

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Rome wasn't built in a day – much like the world-famous companies that we all recognize today. Even they had to start from something – and you might be surprised when you find out that quite a few of them started out by doing things completely different than they are doing now.

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The Next Web

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According to a report by the New York Post, Amazon is said to be quietly testing new scanners that can identify human hands to make a store purchase.

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Inhabitat

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Using the crimson desert landscape as inspiration, London-based practice Anarchitect converted two old buildings into an eco retreat. See the results here.

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Mashable Magazine

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Walmart has transformed a regular grocery store into an AI lab that tests new retail technologies in a real-world setting.

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Inhabitat

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Serving over 40 million customers every month, grocery giant ALDI announced an ambitious plan to offer 100 percent sustainable packaging by 2025.

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Pack World

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In early November, an independent London supermarket became one of the first in the world to introduce dedicated Plastic Free Zones. In February 2018, Dutch supermarket Ekoplaza opened its first store with a plastic-free aisle containing more than 700 grocery items. The idea came to Ekoplaza from the environmental group A Plastic Planet.
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Inhabitat

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The imperfect food movement continues to rise in popularity as companies, like Imperfect Produce in Silicon Valley, capitalize on a growing trend to fight food waste around the country. Imperfect Produce and similar companies offer boxes of ugly and misshapen produce to customers, saving a lot of food that would otherwise be discarded. While the movement is cutting down on food waste, small farmers are worried that it might have a negative affect on their livelihoods.
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fastcompany

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It’s easy to forget that the big box store is still young. Even in the relatively short history of U.S. suburbs, it’s a newcomer, spawned in the late 1960s and reaching its apex before the recession in the late 2000s. But within those four decades or so, tens of thousands of warehouse stores and malls changed what the U.S. looks like–a testament to how cheap and easy they are to build (about $45 per square foot, a third of what the average home costs per square foot).
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Core 77

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Take a trip to virtually any region of Japan and you'll see plenty of mamachari; translated as "mom's bike," mamachari are no-frills utility bicycles with a handy basket used as grocery getters, kiddie haulers and commuter vehicles.
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feedproxy

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Trigo Vision, an AI startup founded by former members of the Israeli army’s special forces and intelligence community, just came out of stealth mode with a target in its sights: Amazon’s Go store.
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