Design Boom

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last year we reported that MIT researchers were investigating how a fleet of autonomous boats could improve urban waterways in amsterdam. dubbed roboat, the research project saw the senseable city lab at MIT, directed by carlo ratti, collaborate with the amsterdam institute for advanced metropolitan solutions (AMS). together they envisioned a new kind of on-demand infrastructure comprising autonomous platforms that could combine together to form floating bridges and stages, collect waste, deliver goods, and transport people, all while collecting data about the city. 
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Dezeen

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Canadian design studio SDI has presented its WRKkit concept for adaptable offices at IDS Toronto, using a booth modelled on a giant DIY toy.

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Design Boom

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in an attempt to update the construction of ‘simple’ wooden chairs, japanese designer ryuichi kozeki has created a prototype series with a distinct wedge-shaped part that connects the back and seat, creating a curve that perfectly supports the small of the back. presented at the greenhouse during this year’s stockholm furniture fair, the collection comes in a set that includes the chairs and a matching small table.
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Design Boom

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package delivery service UPS has joined forces with the world’s largest consumer product companies and international recycling leader terracycle to unveil a new system of recycling that could rid the world of plastics. the system, entitled loop encourages a reusable and returnable cycle for managing consumer product packaging that enables consumers to reduce their single-use packaging consumption.
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Wired

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Climate change is the most horrific threat our species has ever known: No matter how powerful you are or how much money you have, our transforming planet is a reckoning for every one of us. But there are degrees to this misery. If you’re perched in a Manhattan penthouse, the effects might not be immediately apparent (because you don’t care or aren’t paying attention, or both). If you’re a subsistence farmer in Kenya, the situation is already much more dire.
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Dezeen

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London-based designer Keiichi Matsuda imagines how augmented reality will define the workstation of the future in short film Merger

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Mashable Magazine

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I'll spare you all of the technical advantages of Samsung's newly announced 75-inch Micro LED TV — an even wider color gamut and higher peak brightness and deeper black levels — and instead wow you with the TV's customizable design, because it's really something to behold.
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Wired

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In Nihonbashi, a business district of Tokyo named for an old, beautiful bridge that has been obscured by an expressway, it is very difficult for a foreigner to get cash. When I was in Tokyo last week to give a talk, the first two ATM machines I tried refused to cooperate with my American debit cards. The third one worked, giving me large, beautifully designed ¥10,000 bills featuring a dot portrait of a somewhat glum Yukichi Fukuzawa, scholar and founder of Keio University.
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Wired

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The Future Book was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.
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fastcompany

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Start the new year off right–with insightful books on everything from computer history to animal evolution, chosen by design leaders.

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Web Urbanist

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Now open on the edge of Aarhus, Denmark’s second-largest city, the Harbor Bath project features a main 150-foot-long pool as well as diving and children’s pools, plus a pair of saunas. Naturally, the water is drawn directly in from the surroundings.
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Pack World

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To achieve its goals, Stamford, CT-based Nestlé Waters North America is expanding its relationship with supplier Plastrec and working with other suppliers to support the company’s ability to nearly quadruple its use of food-grade recycled plastic, or rPET, in less than three years.
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Colourlovers

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Most popular colors in every decade of mankind are reflecting on our habits and our needs, the development of different industries, changes within our lifestyles, global politics and economy. With the fast development of technology all around us, revolutions are made in almost every segment of human life - music, film industry, cartoons, games, nightlife, food industry, the sex industry, and many others.
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Mashable Magazine

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The test delivers a button prompt to “show me that scene again.” While useful for sports, some complain that it's disruptive to movies.

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fastcompany

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There’s not much that hasn’t already been said of 3D printing or the predicted revolution that promised to transform manufacturing and put a MakerBot in every home. While the technology continues to evolve, with new applications like cutting-edge medical uses and building-size structures, it has yet to truly overtake industrial production in the mainstream market–though not for lack of effort.
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BBC

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Ministers give a timeline for the UK’s first carbon capture and storage project, as research funding is announced.

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