monakuhn

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Mona Kuhn is best known for her large-scale photographs of the human form. Her approach is unusual in that she develops close relationships with her subjects, resulting in images of remarkable intimacy, and creating the effect of people naked but comfortable in their own skin. In addition, Kuhn's playful combination of visual strategies, such as translucency explores our connectedness with the environment. A sublime sense of comfort and intelligence permeates her works, showing the human body in its most natural state while simultaneously re-envisioning the nude as a contemporary canon of art.

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The Guardian

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While enjoying an idyllic lockdown in France, the 83-year-old artist has created perhaps his most important exhibition ever – offering hope to an injured world

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This is Colossal

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Swollen, glistening, and saturated with illusion, the ubiquitous water drop absorbed Kim Tschang-Yeul throughout his career. The Korean artist, who died earlier this year, was faithful to the seemingly mundane subject matter, choosing to depict the dewy orbs repeatedly after an initial painting in 1972 following his relocation to France. Inspired originally by a water-soaked canvas in his studio, Kim nurtured the viscous element in his hyperrealistic paintings created across nearly five decades. In an essay about the artist’s unending commitment, Dr. Cleo Roberts writes:

It is a tendency that seems to unite many of Korea’s avant-garde who took from Art Informel in the early ‘60s, including Ha Chong-Hyun and Park Seo-Bo. In this generation of artists, there is a ritualistic devotion to a chosen form, process, and, at times, colour. One could venture that, in the context of living in a volatile country ravaged by war, the security of immersion in a singular mode was an empowering choice, and may have been a necessary psychological counterpoint.

Whether depicting a singular pendant-shaped drop or canvas strewn with perfectly round bulbs, each of the oil-based works exhibits a deft approach to shadow and texture. The bloated forms appear to bead on the surface and are imbued with a sense of impermanence: if disturbed by even a small movement, they look as if they could burst or run down the surface.

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Design Boom

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Designed by hungarian architect antti lovag in the 70s, ‘palais bulles’ (bubble palace) is a 1200 sqm house in the south of france comprising a cluster of interwoven bubble spaces. the iconic dwelling was built between 1979 and 1984 for french industrialist pierre bernard, and was bought in 1992 by the late fashion designer pierre cardin. the theoule sur mer villa is currently for sale, and includes ten bedroom suites decorated by contemporary artists, gardens, water ponds, a swimming pool and a 500-seat outdoor auditorium overlooks the sea while facing the breathtaking bay of cannes.

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betterwebtype

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Telling font styles apart was one of the hardest things to do when I started working as a designer. Being self-taught, the only major difference I could see was that a font was either a serif or a sans-serif. But the more I explored, the more I realised how vast the universe of font styles actually is.

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Dezeen

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Architecture studio Dietmar Feichtinger Architectes has built a curving wood and steel bridge over railway tracks in Angers, France.

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adobe

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A how-to guide for planning and facilitating online workshops and events, with reflections and resources from Priya Parker, CreativeMornings, and others.

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ilovetypography

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Robert Granjon lived in the 1500s. The new style of typeface he invented in 1557, modeled on contemporary Gothic cursive handwriting, and later came to be know as Civilité, after the Civilité of 'etiquette' books that the typeface often appeared in. Although Granjon really anted his Civilité to become the national typeface of France. However, it never really caught on, and could compete with Roman and Italic fonts.

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The Guardian

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From Bauhaus to bohemian love … the intricate lives and art of interwar modernists are captured in this hugely enjoyable and well-plotted book

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Dezeen

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The French government has announced plans for a sustainability law that will ensure all new public buildings are built from at least 50 per cent timber or other natural materials.

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The Guardian

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This should have been a rollercoaster. Instead, it’s a sedate trudge through giant canvases – giving you the bottle but not the booze, the facts but not the feeling

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Design Boom

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tatzu nishi is the subject of a solo exhibition at ANOMALY in tokyo titled 'the real reasons for unbreakable habits and how to deal with them'.

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Wallpaper*

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Swooshing in just in time for the start of the ski season is Méribel’s newest ski-in/ski-out hotel. With admirable restraint, the Paris-based interior architect Pierre Yovanovitch has gently terraced into the side of a meringue-white slope to spread Le Coucou’s 55 rooms, suites and chalets over ten cascading levels of rugged stone walls and spacious terraces. 

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fastcompany

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Paris Musées has digitized hundreds of thousands of paintings, photographs, and manuscripts for the public to enjoy—and use for commercial or noncommercial purposes.

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Design Boom

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built within an old printing warehouse, the new research and development center has been designed for a french lighting company.

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The Next Web

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The Indian government has played down fears of mass surveillance in response to concerns that its proposed facial recognition system lacks adequate oversight.

Replying to a legal notice filed by the Internet Freedom Foundation (IFF), a Delhi-based non-profit that works on digital liberties, the country’s National Crime Record Bureau (NCRB) defended the move, stating it doesn’t interfere with privacy of citizens as it “only automates the existing police procedure of comparing suspects’ photos with those listed in LEA’s [Law Enforcement Agency] databases.”

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