The Next Web

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It was inspiring to read about the launch of Waitrose’s trial in Oxford offering consumers a range of products free of packaging. Their system isn’t revolutionary – smaller supermarkets have been doing the same thing for quite some time, as have many committed people. But it’s the first time that a major supermarket has made a big move away from the packaging-dependent model that has dominated major supermarkets for years.

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Dezeen

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We no longer need desks, say designers Ed Barber and Jay Osgerby, as the office of the future is more of a meeting place than a work environment.

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Design Curial

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Veronica Simpson looks at the new temporary accommodation the practice Reed Watts has created for the homeless.

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designyoutrust

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It should be one of the main goals in today’s society to reduce plastic consumption and to educate people on the environmental and global changes and problems that we are currently facing. Even though many of us believe that recycling will solve the problem, and continue using plastic, it is actuall

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Ars Technica

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Displacing jet fuel is a first step toward reducing the carbon footprint of flight.

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Dezeen

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Riga Design and Art School graduate Keita Augstkalne has developed an indoor plant watering system that provides water for plants who have been neglected by their busy owners.

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Wired

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The study has its origin, strangely enough, in tea. Back in 2006, researchers thought tea drinkers might have fewer heart attacks. So Kenneth Mukamal, an epidemiologist at the Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, recruited at-risk adults and told them to drink either three cups of black tea a day or three cups of water. Getting participants to stick to the program is notoriously difficult, so to make sure they were drinking their tea, Mukumal tested urine samples from a subgroup of participants for gallic acid, a tea breakdown product. After six months, they ran the numbers: Tea had virtually no effect on a person’s cardiovascular risk.

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