Fast.co Design

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The image we associate with female empowerment during World War II was only displayed for two weeks at the time–and few Americans ever even saw it. Why is it so popular today?

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Wired

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If you know the company Square, it's probably because you've paid in a store using a Square “stand,” a dock that supports a tablet, or you've swiped your card through Square Reader, a smartphone dongle that processes payments. These products have a soothing, decidedly Apple-y aesthetic, from the simple dongle to the all-white stand that typically houses an iPad. But since late last year, Square has been quietly selling its own custom-made tablet, the Square Register, a $999, Android-based system. And the company has taken an obsessive approach to designing the product.
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Pack World

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Developed by Optima, the novel packaging was designed by Optima in collaboration with other companies. The barrier features are what make this Inline Can special, says Optima. Specific details on the materials, however, are not available at this time.
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Wired

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If you’re grasping for the deeper meaning of an essay or article, consider the possibility that it may not be in the words themselves, but hidden in the shape of the letters. It really could be the case, now that researchers from Columbia University have developed a method called FontCode, which plants data in text through tiny changes in how the letters are shaped.
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Dezeen

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Benjamin Hubert’s design studio Layer has launched a new furniture collection for Moroso, which introduces a new way of bonding upholstery textiles together.

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Design Boom

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china‘s economic transition period, along with the everyday changing information and technology, results in rapid expansion of urbanization. people float up and away in the unshaped cities, following the monotonous day-to-day routine. all together tends to regularize, synchronize, even benumb the ways they think, live and feel. with the spirituality which are now imprisoned under the suits and ties, people are desperate to search for a way out that allows them to let their guards down, return to ego truly and experiencing freewheeling social activities in places such as teahouses and coffee shops.
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