Design Boom

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pico colectivo reveals a new outside structure that is meant to unite the community —  ‘implant on the roof’ at on of the facilities of madrid’s do it yourself institute is a program that generates use value in the periphery of a building. the extension beyond the interior produces a space on the margin, as a way to question the lack of common places and more autonomous and free spaces in our cities.
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Dezeen

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London-based designer Keiichi Matsuda imagines how augmented reality will define the workstation of the future in short film Merger

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Wired

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In Nihonbashi, a business district of Tokyo named for an old, beautiful bridge that has been obscured by an expressway, it is very difficult for a foreigner to get cash. When I was in Tokyo last week to give a talk, the first two ATM machines I tried refused to cooperate with my American debit cards. The third one worked, giving me large, beautifully designed ¥10,000 bills featuring a dot portrait of a somewhat glum Yukichi Fukuzawa, scholar and founder of Keio University.
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Wired

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The Future Book was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.
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Wired

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I’d ridden the motorcycle part of the way up a small dirt hill, and was trying to simply reverse my way back down when I fell off the machine. As I went down, I tightened my grip, inadvertently pinning the throttle. I soon found myself underneath a pirouetting motorcycle.
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fastcompany

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There’s not much that hasn’t already been said of 3D printing or the predicted revolution that promised to transform manufacturing and put a MakerBot in every home. While the technology continues to evolve, with new applications like cutting-edge medical uses and building-size structures, it has yet to truly overtake industrial production in the mainstream market–though not for lack of effort.
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Dezeen

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Pentagram and Map have set out to prove that computer hardware doesn't have to be “cold dark boxes”, by designing colourful products for machine-learning technology startup Graphcore.

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Design Boom

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eight years after its premiere, ‘the clock’ finally arrives at the TATE modern in london where it will be screened until 20 january 2019, including an overnight 24-hour screening on 1-2 december! the california-born, swiss-raised and london-based marclay, originally debuted the acclaimed installation at the white cube gallery in london in 2010. the looped supercut is a 24-hour montage of thousands of film and TV clips of clocks, edited together to show the actual time (to which it can be locally synchronized). playing to huge crowds across the world since it’s first release, it has become the most popular video art work ever and also won the coveted golden lion award at the 2011 venice art biennale.
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Gizmodo

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There’s just something about this phone. From the moment I laid eyes on this thing, it just kind of made me happy. It’s small and adorable like a newborn puppy, and despite how petite it appears it photos, it looks and feels even smaller in person. And I’m not the only one that had this reaction. When I brought it into the office, people crowded around marveled. One person cooed at it, another said, “it’s perfect,” while a third remarked that this is the exact sort of thing they’d wished someone would make for years.

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Hongkiat

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The context of our online interactions has dramatically changed lately, and in the recent years we have encountered a significant shift in the field of technology; Information Age has been replaced by the Experience Age.
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Gizmodo

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Tide just announced a new alternative to the classic bottle of laundry detergent. It basically looks and works just like a box of wine, which is sort of funny because of that whole meme about teens eating Tide Pods. But the new Tide Eco-Box is no joke. It’s actually a glimpse into a future where Amazon is dictating what our stuff looks like.

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Design Curial

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With organisations that use them often being accused of Big Brother-style surveillance, workplace sensors are as controversial as they are pervasive. But what insight can they provide the design community? Cathy Hayward talks to the experts
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