Design Boom

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last year we reported that MIT researchers were investigating how a fleet of autonomous boats could improve urban waterways in amsterdam. dubbed roboat, the research project saw the senseable city lab at MIT, directed by carlo ratti, collaborate with the amsterdam institute for advanced metropolitan solutions (AMS). together they envisioned a new kind of on-demand infrastructure comprising autonomous platforms that could combine together to form floating bridges and stages, collect waste, deliver goods, and transport people, all while collecting data about the city. 
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Wired

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Climate change is the most horrific threat our species has ever known: No matter how powerful you are or how much money you have, our transforming planet is a reckoning for every one of us. But there are degrees to this misery. If you’re perched in a Manhattan penthouse, the effects might not be immediately apparent (because you don’t care or aren’t paying attention, or both). If you’re a subsistence farmer in Kenya, the situation is already much more dire.
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Wired

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First algorithms figured out how to decipher images. That’s why you can unlock an iPhone with your face. More recently, machine learning has become capable of generating and altering images and video.
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Dezeen

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Archi-Union Architects has completed a conference centre on Shanghai's West Bund in just 100 days, using robot-assisted design and construction.

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The Next Web

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The problem with healthcare is simple: there’s not enough of it. In a perfect world we’d all have our own personal physicians like the Queen. But in reality, the average doctor sees thousands of patients a year. Solving this problem could take decades. Unless, of course, someone were to “hack” the system itself using artificial intelligence.
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Wired

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Big things happen when computers get smaller. Or faster. And quantum computing is about chasing perhaps the biggest performance boost in the history of technology. The basic idea is to smash some barriers that limit the speed of existing computers by harnessing the counterintuitive physics of subatomic scales.
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feedproxy

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One of the more complex and misunderstood topics making headlines lately is artificial intelligence. People like Elon Musk warn that robots could one day destroy us all, while other experts claim that we’re on the brink of an AI winter and the technology is going nowhere. Making heads or tails of it all is difficult, but the best place to start is with deep learning. Here’s what you need to know.
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feedproxy

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Facebook researchers have developed a new tool for that friend who never seems to have his eyes open during photos. The tool uses artificial intelligence to retouch the eyes much like Adobe fills over content using the “content-aware fill tool.” Adobe’s tool takes an educated guess at an item’s surroundings and fills in what it …

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Mashable Magazine

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The ridesharing company applied for a patent for a product that detects altered user state. It could make rides safer by giving drivers more information.

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Mashable Magazine

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Against a global backdrop of emerging technologies and ever-changing relationships between businesses and consumers, one thing is clear: leaders in the finance and banking industries will increasingly look to artificial intelligence to understand and engage with their customers in new ways. 
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Mashable Magazine

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As if we needed more reasons to be freaked out by increasingly powerful digital assistants, there’s a new nightmare scenario: The music you listen to or conversations you hear on TV could hijack your digital assistant with commands undetectable to human ears.

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Google

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Google today introduced a new feature meant to help users compose and send email faster than ever. The feature, called Smart Compose, tries to understand typed text so that artificial intelligence can suggest words and phrases to finish your sentences. If you like the suggestion, just hit tab to paste it into the message.

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Wired

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It was 1968. I was 8 years old. The space race was in full swing. For the first time, a space probe had recently landed on another planet (Venus). And I was eagerly studying everything I could to do with space. Then on April 2, 1968 (May 15 in the UK), the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey was released—and I was keen to see it.
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