De-milked

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Tim Flach is a British photographer and the author of the project titled “Endangered”. The photographer spent 2 years traveling the world and taking powerful pictures of exotic animals that may soon be extinct.
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This is Colossal

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D. Allan Drummond (previously) is an associate professor of biochemistry, molecular biology, and human genetics at the University of Chicago. A few years ago Drummond began turning his extensive research of fossils and prehistoric sea creatures into detailed computer renderings which he then 3D prin

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This is Colossal

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OWL, a Lisbon-based lamp brand founded by two architects in 2016, offers a wide range of friendly wild animals that can be turned into volumetric lamps using simple folding techniques. As you might guess, OWL offers a few different owl designs, as well as roaring hippos, curious rabbits, and proud p

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MINIMALS is a new short film by Helsinki-based animator and director Lucas Zanotto (previously) composed of fictionalized kinetic sculptures based on real animals. The series of short animations catch each simplified creature in a repetitive loop that imitates the extension of an elephant's trunk, a

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Mashable Magazine

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We live in a beautiful world — and not just because there’s a Coldplay song that says so, but because there’s an endless bounty of natural wonder that we’re constantly surrounded by. Sometimes, all it takes is a little switch in our perspective to help us see it: because after all, the human eye is limited, even when our creativity and imagination might be vast. 

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Creative constructions of Lego bricks spring to life in these advertising campaigns developed by Asawin Tejasakulsin, a senior art director at Ogilvy & Mather in Bangkok, Thailand. The two series, Imagine and Build the Future, amplify the childhood wonder central to the Lego brand, devising play

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BBC

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Image copyright Impossible FoodsImage caption It looks like meat, it even bleeds. But does it taste meaty enough to convert committed carnivores? The meat industry is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions and deforestation, and a huge consumer of water. But can lab-grown veggie alternatives wean us off our addiction to red meat? Silicon Valley tech companies are betting on it.
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Wired

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It was 1968. I was 8 years old. The space race was in full swing. For the first time, a space probe had recently landed on another planet (Venus). And I was eagerly studying everything I could to do with space. Then on April 2, 1968 (May 15 in the UK), the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey was released—and I was keen to see it.
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BBC

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Image copyright ReutersImage caption The Amazon molly is thought to be a hybrid of two different species Evolutionary theory suggests that species favouring asexual reproduction will rapidly become extinct, as their genomes accumulate deadly mutations over time.
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BBC

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Image copyright PAImage caption More than eight million tonnes of plastic enters the world's oceans every year. The BBC is to ban single-use plastics by 2020, after TV series Blue Planet II highlighted the scale of sea pollution.
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BBC

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Google says it will soon alter its Search tool to provide “diverse perspectives” where appropriate.

The change will affect the boxed text that often appears at the top of results pages – known as a Snippet – which contains a response sourced from a third-party site.

At present, Google provides only a single box but it will sometimes show multiple Snippets in the future.

The change could help Google tackle claims it sometimes spreads lies.

But one expert warned the move introduced fresh risks of its own.

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Ars Technica

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Some human tissues, like the liver and muscles, retain the ability to regrow after damage. But most of our bodies do not—if you lose a limb, the limb’s gone. But elsewhere in the animal kingdom, regeneration is much more widespread. Many reptiles can regrow tails, and some salamanders can replace entire limbs. More distantly related worms called planaria can be cut into multiple pieces and see each piece regrow an entirely new body.

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Wired

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Northern England is set to get a whole lot greener. On Sunday, the UK government unveiled plans for a vast new forest spanning the country from coast to coast. Shadowing the path of the east-west M62 Highway, the new forest will create a broad green rib across England from Liverpool to the east coast city of Hull.

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Since we last checked in with Antwerp-based street artist Dzia (previously), the Belgian muralist has been busy adding fauna flair to walls in an increasingly widening swath across the globe. Recent projects have taken him to China, Norway, and Spain. Dzia, who is classically trained with a masters in fine art at the Royal Academy in Antwerp, primarily depicts wild animals — foxes and birds seem to be recurring favorites. His unique style creates a mosaic of colors following the contours of the animal’s form. In his more recent work, Dzia has begun to add tonal shading within each defined area, adding a sense of volume to the well-defined figures. You can follow his work and travels on Instagram.

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