The Next Web

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While we all know that billionaires control a substantial amount of the world’s wealth – in fact, current projections see the richest 1% controlling 2/3 of it by 2030 – what they use their vast fortunes on may surprise you.

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The Next Web

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In the past couple of years, photo editing software has evolved a lot. With new AI capabilities, it’s now easier to manipulate snaps according to your need. But this new AI made by the researchers from MIT and IBM lets you add, edit, or remove an object just with a click.

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brainpickings

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“In this age of communication… who can be free from influence, — preconception? But — it all depends upon what one does with this cross-fertilization: — is it digested, or does it bring indigestion?”

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brainpickings

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“Time seems to have stopped in a wild summer world of long, long ago.”

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The Next Web

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Boston Dynamics creates some of the most incredible robots on the planet. From the company’s back-flipping biped to the four-legged dog-bot that Jeff Bezos hangs out with, you’ve probably seen videos of its robots completing feats of agility under extraordinary circumstances. But what happens when a robot gets sick and tired of being kicked, pushed, …

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The Next Web

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It was inspiring to read about the launch of Waitrose’s trial in Oxford offering consumers a range of products free of packaging. Their system isn’t revolutionary – smaller supermarkets have been doing the same thing for quite some time, as have many committed people. But it’s the first time that a major supermarket has made a big move away from the packaging-dependent model that has dominated major supermarkets for years.

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The Next Web

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A team of researchers recently pioneered the world’s first AI universe simulator. It’s fast; it’s accurate; and its creators are baffled by its ability to understand things about the cosmos that it shouldn’t. Scientists have used computer simulations to try and digitally reverse-engineer the origin and evolution of our universe for decades. The best traditional …

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adobe

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Two graphic designers with a love for letterpress took over a 250 year old business and turned it into a living museum, a small-run press, and an unofficial clubhouse for print and typeface wonks.

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adobe

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Slack's Head of Brand Communications on why words matter in product design, and how to wield them.

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Google

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The idea of a “biodegradable” plastic suggests a material that would degrade to little or nothing over a period of time, posing less of a hazard to wildlife and the environment. This is the sort of claim often made by plastic manufacturers, yet recent research has revealed supposedly biodegradable plastic bags still intact after three …

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The Next Web

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The big problem with plastics is that though they last for a very long time, most are thrown away after only one use. Since plastics were invented in the 1950s, about 8,300m metric tonnes (Mt) have been made, but over half (4,900 Mt) is already in landfill or has been lost to the environment. In 2010 alone, an estimated 4.8 to 12.7 Mt went into the oceans.

Only a small proportion of the hundreds of types of plastics can be recycled by conventional technology. But there are other things we can do to reuse plastics after they’ve served their original purpose. My research, for example, focuses on chemical recycling, and I’ve been looking into how food packaging can be used to create new materials like wires for electricity.

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It's Nice That

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The South Korean illustrator talks us through her latest publication, exploring the unnoticed movements in quiet landscapes.

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Google

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You might not be able to stomach soybeans for breakfast, lunch and dinner, but the animals you eat do. Cultivation of the staple crop takes up an area five times the size of the UK, and 85% of that area is used for animal feed. Thanks to projected rapid growth in both world population and …

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brainpickings

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“In forty years of medical practice, I have found only two types of non-pharmaceutical 'therapy' to be vitally important for patients with chronic neurological diseases: music and gardens.”

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The Next Web

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On its blog today, Google talked up Game Builder, its sandbox for desktops that lets you create 3D games without having to write any code – and it's free.

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