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Without sacrificing any of its industrial charm, Dutch architects transformed an old train shed into a gorgeous library and community event space. “LocHal” is Tilburg’s “new public city forum,” say…

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From the wicker chairs of the 1920s, the evolution of airplane seats has rapidly diverged in two different directions — toward luxurious full-sized beds on first class international flights and the…

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There’s something extra eerie about places that are not quite abandoned just yet, but edging closer and closer to a prolonged death process. Relics of another time, these architectural remnants feel like physical connections to all the lives that passed through them, many of which have already met an end. Lacking any efforts to preserve or revive them, they slowly crumble, waiting for their inevitable demolition. Photographer Michael Eastman specializes in capturing such places on film in all their deteriorating glory.
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Now open on the edge of Aarhus, Denmark’s second-largest city, the Harbor Bath project features a main 150-foot-long pool as well as diving and children’s pools, plus a pair of saunas. Naturally, the water is drawn directly in from the surroundings.
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A London architect has is working to sketch a new city each day, mining his imagination and experience for fresh ideas for a full year, a practice inspired in part by the failures of modern urban p…

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In the wake of World War I, the United Kingdom developed a powerful yet relatively low-tech architectural system for detecting incoming enemy airplanes, the remnants of which can still be found across the countryside.
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A little bit Dada, a little bit “only sold on television,” intentionally useless inventions called Chindogu look like a bunch of plastic junk at first glance, but there’s more to it tha…

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Architects, carpenters and other design and construction professionals often carry measuring tape wherever they go, but this small wheel makes for a much less bulky companion tool. Measuring trundl…

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A pivotal institution in the early development of Modernism, the iconic Bauhuas school in Germany has been renovated to match its 1926 look and feel, complete with studios and sleeping spaces now open to the public.
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Cantilevered off the steep edges, near the top of the famous Rock of Gibraltar, it’s hard to believe this peaceful viewing platform once housed anti-aircraft guns, its critical location a str…

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Half-sunken into the sea along the Norwegian coastline, Snøhetta’s submerged restaurant project looks like yet another cool rendering that will never actually be built – but a new series of images by architectural photographer Aldo Amoretti reveals promising progress. ‘Under’ is set to be Europe’s first underwater restaurant, with a monolithic form that appears to be sliding into the water from the rocky shore. It will double as a research facility for marine life, its design and name paying tribute to the culture of coastal Norway and the city of Lindesnes in particular.
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Marking the 400th anniversary of the Plaza Mayor in Madrid, a grassy circle measuring over 35,000 square feet was rolled out to create seating space for over 100,000 visitors across a four-day celebration.
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A cabin is defined both by a remote location and a certain rusticity, whether it’s a wilderness hut for hikers or a family retreat, but that doesn’t mean it has to be a basic wooden shack. Modern cabin design shakes up this typology depending on the setting and the user’s needs – it could be a geometric prefab on stilts, a glass-fronted structure hovering over a lake, a series of small off-grid buildings that come together into a cohesive whole, or a totally transparent glass room providing stunning views of its island surroundings.
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Do you ever think about just how far into the Earth the ocean actually reaches at its greatest depths? Truly the last frontier aside from outer space and the core of the Earth itself, much of the area below the ocean’s surface remains unexplored despite the fact that it represents 95% of the living space on this planet. We know very little about what it looks like down there and what kinds of creatures might be lurking in its darkest corners. To put it all into perspective, webcomic Xkcd.com created an infographic comparing various oceanic features to markers like the world’s deepest lake and tallest building. Note the Burj Khalifa, taller than Crater Lake is deep.
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There’s nothing quite so annoying as having a battery-powered device with one too few batteries, which in many cases would render it useless. In a common-sense twist on typical designs, MUJI’s portable LED torch has space for four batteries (two AA and two AAA) but, ingeniously, will function on as few as one.

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Dine underwater in Norway, beneath a ceiling of butterflies in Bangkok, amidst kinetic planetary spheres in Bulgaria or immersed in virtual reality nature in Tokyo with the most stunning modern restaurant designs of 2017. Some people say ambiance is just as integral to the overall enjoyment of a meal as the food itself, and these 14 new restaurant interiors from around the world offer multi-sensory delights ranging from the understated and sophisticated to the wild and unexpected.

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