Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

I’ll make this quick: In their just-published book, User Friendly: How the Hidden Rules of Design Are Changing the Way We Live, Work, and Play, Cliff Kuang and Robert Fabricant have written a contemporary treatise that is sure to become a foundational text. (And I’ll make this simple: If you’re looking for holiday gifts and you’re a designer-type, buy ten of these, wrap ’em up, and figure out who gets ’em as you’re walking out the door. Guaranteed satisfaction for all your employees, partners, clients, and students, this book would also be useful to anyone—or anyone’s parents—who wonder what designers actually do.)

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Back when I worked corporate, all departments were silo’d off with tap- -to-enter badge reader pads. Other companies use keypads, like this Swedish office–where someone has thoughtfully anticipated that you may have a coffee cup in one hand and something occupying the other.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

If there’s one failure of package design that seems to be consistent across brands, it’s the microscopic fonts used on medicine labels. They provide crucial information on products often being purchased by elderly folk with less-than-stellar eyesight, but the brand name is always given way more real estate than the active ingredients.

Smart stores compensate. This Rite-Aid’s solution: A shelf-mounted magnifying glass on a retractable line.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

…the internet erupted with outrage (of course), stating that the new Space Force logo was a rip-off of the StarFleet Command United Federation of Planets logo used in the Star Trek franchise. Here they are side-by-side.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Non-pneumatic, airless tires have been a long time coming, but have yet to crack the consumer market. Bridgestone may change that, or at least get them into the public consciousness; as tire sponsor of this summer’s Tokyo Olympics, the company will provide a fleet of bicycles (presumably in Olympic Village, the details are unclear) kitted out with their non-pneumatic tires.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The UK’s Hope Technology and Lotus Engineering have teamed up to create an Olympic superweapon: The HB.T, a carbon fiber bike with 3D-printed titanium elements that the Great Britain Cycling Team will ride in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Snapmaker’s invention is a desktop machine that can 3D print, and do lasercutting, and do CNC milling. The metal-framed machine has different heads that can be attached, depending on which operation you’d like to perform.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

What does the International Space Station have in common with Dave Hakkens? Both can recycle their own plastic. Actually, while Hakkens has been doing that for a while, the ISS will only gain the capability on November 2nd. That’s when they’re due to receive delivery, courtesy of a Cygnus cargo spacecraft launched from an Antares rocket.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

In this video, designer, technologist, and current Chief Experience Officer at Publicis Sapient John Maeda talks about public failure as a form of useful user research, the beauty of designers who take great risk in order to enact chance, and more.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Vietnam was one of the most pristine places I’d even seen–in the 1990s. Today the country, once renowned for its pristine beaches and waterways, has suffered heavily from the plastics explosion of the past few decades. Take a look at this photo of a beach in Nam Dinh

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

What’s one of the most influential lessons you learned in design school? For me it was “It’s all about the transitions.” Nailing the overall form of an object is important, but how you handle the transitions–the areas where different surfaces and materials meet–is where you can manifest the pro-level design considerations that separate good work from great work.

It’s true of architecture too, of course. Everything from window flashing to door trim to interior molding is an opportunity to demonstrate excellence and a love of design.

How best to inculcate this in kids?

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

It used to be that if you wanted a tracksaw, you had to pony up for a high-priced Festool–if there was even a dealer in your area. Nowadays DeWalt, Grizzly, Kreg, Makita and more all make them, and they’re sold at local big box stores.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

On the face of it, I think this may be the dumbest idea I’ve seen this year. Japan’s Morita Miyata Corporation, which has been making firefighting equipment for over a century, has designed this set of fire extinguishers

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Shai Goitein has always loved airplanes. As a little boy he built hobby models; as a teenager he took up paragliding; and when he joined the Israeli military, he started a 15-year career as a pilot.

He missed that aeronautic rush when he went back to civilian life and became Kodak’s lead designer, overseeing industrial design at six different R&D centers around the world. He started teaching STEM classes around aeronautics, and soon launched a runaway-success Kickstarter campaign that brought those models to kids and classrooms worldwide.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

Navigating the world of crowdfunding can be overwhelming, to put it lightly. Which projects are worth backing? Where’s the filter to weed out the hundreds of useless smart devices? To make the process less frustrating, we scour the various online crowdfunding platforms to put together a weekly roundup of our favorite campaigns for your viewing (and spending!) pleasure.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

For those aware of the arguably unethical process of silk harvesting need not worry as the silk proteins used in development are synthetic. Aalto University professor Markus Linder reports in a recent press release, “‘Because we know the structure of the [spider web silk’s] DNA, we can copy it and use this to manufacture silk protein molecules which are chemically similar to those found in spider web threads. The DNA has all this information contained in it’.”

This study is just one of many demonstrating the potential for new materials to take the place of their more harmful counterparts in the future. Only time will tell which materials ultimately win out.

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment

Core 77

See original post here for image copyright

Content from original post

The initial drive behind Dust London was “to step away from the computerized and the mechanistic,” as the designers wrote to us in a recent email. After exploring various natural materials, they gravitated toward tea waste for its “range of natural pigments and subtle textures.” They also thought it would be a good conversation starter to get people talking about the potentials of sustainable design. “As a nation of tea drinkers in Britain, we find that people can relate.”

View Original from Core 77

Comments on INSIGHT FOUND

Make a comment