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The figures are visible under UV light; other paintings may also have hidden drawings.

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Displacing jet fuel is a first step toward reducing the carbon footprint of flight.

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Even modest warming leads to more drought and excessive heat for barley crops.

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Enlarge / Time passes faster or slower for a skier going up and down a steep mountain, depending on what that skier is experiencing. Kolbjørn Skarpnes & Rita Elmkvist Nilsen / NTNU Communication Div. & KISN reader comments 88 Share this story The philosopher Martin Heidegger suggested in the 1920s that time persists solely as a consequence of the events that take place within it. Now, a team of Norwegian scientists has confirmed the mechanism the brain uses to make sense of the passage of time as we experience something, thanks to the help of a chocolate-loving lab rat.
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A heat wave reveals ghostly outlines of long-buried archaeological sites in the UK.

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Enlarge / A view of the Pilsworth Liquid Air Energy Storage system. reader comments 103 Share this story A first-of-its-kind energy-storage system has been added to the grid in the UK. The 5MW/15MWh system stores energy in an unusual way: it uses excess electricity to cool ambient air down to -196°C (-320°F), where the gases in the air become liquid. That liquid is stored in an insulated, low-pressure container.
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Enlarge / TV painting instructor/artist Bob Ross using a large paint brush to touch up one of his large seascapes in his studio at home. reader comments 43 Share this story Blissful and soothing reruns of Bob Ross’ The Joy of Painting can make even hardened Internet users drift away to a sublime dream world, complete with happy little trees and happy little clouds. Now, for those that can’t get enough during the day—and have trouble drifting off at bedtime—there’s a happy little audio series.
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Speakers recently flew in from around (or perhaps, across?) the Earth for a three-day event held in Birmingham: the UK’s first ever public Flat Earth Convention. It was well attended, and it wasn’t just three days of speeches and YouTube clips (though, granted, there was a lot of this). There was also a lot of team-building, networking, debating, workshops—and scientific experiments.

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Enlarge / Huh, never seen that before. reader comments 82 Share this story Newly identified networks of interconnected, fluid-filled chambers that line tissues throughout the human body may qualify as a completely new organ, researchers report in a study published Tuesday in Scientific Reports.
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reader comments 107 Share this story Batteries supply electrons by undergoing reversible chemical reactions. That has meant that all the reactants have to be inside the battery, which adds to its weight and volume. Lithium-air batteries could potentially change that situation. At one electrode, they have pure lithium metal rather than a lithium-containing chemical. At the other, the lithium reacts with oxygen in the air. When the battery is charged, this reaction is reversed, and the oxygen is returned to our atmosphere.
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Enlarge / Transmission electron micrograph of multiple bacteriophages attached to a bacterial cell wall. reader comments 68 Share this story In 2012, a 76-year-old Connecticut doctor had surgery to repair a life-threatening bulge in his aortic arch—the hulking bend that hooks the massive artery around the heart, routing oxygenated blood both upward and downward. Surgeons successfully used a synthetic graft to shore up the vital conduit. But soon after, a tenacious film of drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria formed on the graft.
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Enlarge / Molybdenum disulfide, one of the 2D materials we knew about. reader comments 43 Share this story Graphene may seem like a modern wonder-material, but it has been with us for ages in the form of graphite. Graphene is a sheet of carbon atoms bonded to each other, just one atom thick; graphite is just an agglomeration of these sheets layered on top of each other. To study graphene, however, it took someone clever to devise a way of peeling single layers off from this agglomeration (the secret turned out to be a piece of tape).
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Enlarge / Splitting photons up into a collection of neighboring frequencies may help with quantum computation. reader comments 23 Share this story Way back when I started writing for Ars, experimental quantum computing had just started to take off. At the time, the big demonstrations of quantum computation were very simple calculations, performed using single photons as repositories of quantum information. Back then, demonstrating even a single logical gate was a challenge. Light ruled the roost, and charged particles were reduced to the status of not-quantum-enough.
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