Coolhunting

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An artistic extension of Calico Wallpaper’s ombré effect Aurora collection, inspired by memories of horizons seen around the world by founders Rachel and Nick Cope, the Brooklyn brand’s…

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Coolhunting

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With admirable restraint Braun and Virgil Abloh have gone to the archive and updated one of the brand’s most sculptural designs, the sleek, horizontal 1965 Wandanlage Hi-Fi wall unit. The original’s powder white coated metal is replaced with polished chrome; while that may have been too much in 1965, it’s well suited to 2021. The chrome references both the brands frequent use of the material and Abloh’s “cultural and musical references of the last 100 years.”

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This is Colossal

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Approach the delicate glass artworks by Rui Sasaki, and witness the unpredictable patterns of the weather through a subtle glow of blue light. The Japanese artist’s experiential body of work translates varying forecasts into speckled sculptures that radiate once encountered, an intimate process that Sasaki describes as a way to “visualize subtle sunshine, record today’s weather, and transfer it from here to there/from there to here.”

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wptavern

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The Creative Commons search engine will soon be part of WordPress.org, as Automattic will begin sponsoring several members of the CC Search team to maintain it. The engine currently offers over 500 million images, audio, and videos, under Creative Commons licenses or the public domain, aggregating more than 45 different sources.

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Lifehacker

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As a pet owner, you’ve likely come home or woken up to find some evidence of late-night shenanigans around your living space. Fortunately, though, if you’d like to set up some quick surveillance for a particular area (maybe you have nosy roommates, or you’re going out of town and are feeling paranoid), you can check out the website critter.camera.

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Core 77

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In a former factory in Cleveland, Ohio is Ray's Mountain Bike Park. First dreamed up in 1996 and realized in 2004, Ray's is a 160,000-square-foot “bicycle Disneyland” that's home to the world's longest indoor mountain bike trail, which runs nearly a mile. Kyle and April

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blinkist

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Meet Blinkist, a Berlin-based, award-winning startup that improves millions of people’s lives on a daily basis.

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monakuhn

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Mona Kuhn is best known for her large-scale photographs of the human form. Her approach is unusual in that she develops close relationships with her subjects, resulting in images of remarkable intimacy, and creating the effect of people naked but comfortable in their own skin. In addition, Kuhn's playful combination of visual strategies, such as translucency explores our connectedness with the environment. A sublime sense of comfort and intelligence permeates her works, showing the human body in its most natural state while simultaneously re-envisioning the nude as a contemporary canon of art.

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Dezeen

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French luxury house Hermès has partnered with biomaterials company MycoWorks to reimagine its Victoria shopper in a leather alternative grown from mycelium.

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Dezeen

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Spanish architecture studio Delavegacanolasso has created a modular, prefabricated cabin that can be ordered online and delivered on the back of a truck to act as a home office, weekend retreat or even a small dwelling.

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This is Colossal

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Next week, Magnum Photos (previously) is pulling more than 90 photographs from its archive for a print sale that pays tribute to chance moments and serendipity. The Unexpected launches March 22 with a range of compositions documenting more than seven decades worth of “under-explored issues, reportin

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What if we could use biology to restore our balance with nature without giving up modern creature comforts? Advocating for a new kind of environmentalism, scientist and entrepreneur Emily Leproust rethinks modern sustainability at the molecular level, using synthetic biology to create green alternatives. From lab-developed insulin and disease-resistant bananas to airplanes made of super-strong spider silk, she explains how reading and writing DNA can lead to groundbreaking innovations in health, food and materials.

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lithub

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She was born in Japan in 1949. After graduating high school, she moved to Tokyo, where she worked as a bar hostess. She appeared in a few “pink films”—an arty subgenre of sexploitation cinema—directed by Kōji Wakamatsu, among others, and posed for the erotic art photographer Nobuyoshi Araki before devoting herself to writing full time. In 1973, she married the free jazz saxophonist Kaoru Abe, with whom she had a daughter; Abe died of a drug overdose in 1978, one year after their divorce. She was extremely productive in the years after his death, writing short stories, novels, and essays. She took her own life in 1986 at the age of 36.

This is, by and large, the sum total of biographical information readily available to English-language readers on the subject of Izumi Suzuki, a pioneering writer of science fiction whose first collection of stories to appear in English, Terminal Boredom, is available now from Verso. Perhaps unsurprisingly, there is much more information available in English about the male artists with whom she lived and worked; her own life tends to be talked about in relation to theirs, when it is talked about at all. With the publication of Terminal Boredom, English-language readers will be able to discover Suzuki in her own right. So who was she, anyway, and what of the work she left behind?

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